POISONED PRESIDENTS? #3

POISONED PRESIDENTS?
Case 3 of 7 / Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor 1850

Zachary Taylor, elected the 12th president in 1848,  had been a general and national military hero from the War of 1812 and the Mexican-American War (1846-48). Like General Andrew Jackson, his military record served as the foundation for an eventual presidency. Like Jackson, he was a southerner (having lived in several southern states) and a slave owner. And like Jackson, he was a steadfast pro-Unionist with zero tolerance for the secessionists. Like William Henry Harrison, (see Case 1) Taylor’s presidency was brief — just 16 months.

Taylor’s tenure occurred at a momentous time in both world and United States history. As “spontaneous” secessionist / independence revolutions were “coincidentally” rocking Europe and Latin America, the issue (pretext) of slavery in the western territories of the US pitted southern secessionists dubbed by Unionists as “the fire-eaters” against  the pro-Union patriots of both North and South. The nation looked to General-turned-President Taylor for a solution.

Taylor wanted the western territories seeking statehood (New Mexico, California) to be admitted to the Union as soon as their state constitutions arrived in Washington, with no language from Congress about slavery. He did so understanding that both would bar slavery in their state constitutions (“free states”).

At that time, there were thirty states in the Union, equally split between slave and free states. Hence, Taylor’s proposal would have added two or three free states to the Union, upsetting the North-South balance in the Senate. The secessionists cried betrayal! The stage was set for either a clash or a “compromise.” The debate that ensued was one of the most contentious episodes in American history. Taylor, knowing that the Calhounites would only use compromise as a stepping stone for the next offensive (exactly as Andrew Jackson had warned a decade earlier) would have none of it. Some southern Democrats responded to Taylor’s position by calling for a secession convention.

In February of 1850, Taylor held a contentious conference with southern leaders who were threatening secession. He told them that he personally would lead the Army, and “Any persons taken in rebellion against the Union will be hanged with less reluctance than I had hanged deserters and spies in Mexico.”  Being a southerner, a slave holder and a popular military hero, he, like Jackson could have done exactly that and still retained the support of many common southerners while doing so. 

What to do, what to do about a strong “bad ass” southern Unionist like General Taylor? Fortunately for the secessionist intriguers, Taylor wouldn’t be around much longer.

1. Rothschild’s “spontaneous” European & Latin American “nationalist” secessionist revolutions of 1848 (also the same year that the Communist Manifesto was published) failed to break up the various empires, but they did succeed in weakening the existing order of things. The parallels between these subversive uprisings and the curious growth of anti-Union Southern nationalism are striking. // 2. The radical secessionists dubbed “the fire-eaters” originally formed in 1850. // 3. Edmund Ruffin — a leader of the Fire-Eaters — would later go on to fire the first gun of the Civil War, at the Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina in 1861.

After participating in Fourth of July ceremonies at the Washington Monument, Taylor became ill. Within five days he was dead.  A tummy ache caused by eating too many cherries and drinking cold milk, the Fake News said (rolling eyes). Diarrhea, fever, chills — a prolonged death — eerily similar to the death of Presidents Harrison (another pro-Union southern war hero opposed to expanding slavery westward) just nine years earlier, and Polk (another pro-Union southerner) the year before. How conveeenient!

After Taylor’s death, “The Compromise of 1850” — authored by “the great compromiser” that Andrew Jackson wished he had shot, Henry Clay of Kentucky — was passed and signed into law by Taylor’s weak successor, Millard Fillmore. Fillmore — a New York lawyer — feared the secessionists and tried to appease them. But exactly as Taylor had foreseen, it would not satisfy the intriguers. The tragedy of the Civil War was still on course, with the first wave of state secessions being just 12 years away. It would be a conflict in which a future president from a northern state — Abraham Lincoln of Illinois — could, unlike southern slave-owning military heros Jackson, Harrison and Taylor — easily be labeled as an anti-southern “Yankee” and “tyrant.”

As for South Carolina’s John C. Calhoun — the man that Jackson wished he had hanged about 20 years earlier — he died just four month’s before Taylor did. But conspiratorial Calhounism lived on and grew stronger throughout the South. After Calhoun’s passing, Mississippi Senator Jefferson Davis  assumed the unofficial role of southern leadership — until being named President of the Confederate States in 1862 — with “Davis’s pet Jew” (and probably Rothschild-linked)Judah Benjamin telling him what to do.

It’s also worth noting that Fillmore would also go on to send Commodore Matthew Perry to “open up Japan” by threat of force in 1853.  Thus began the military modernization of medieval Japan in advance of its Rothschild-US-UK backed war on Tsarist Russia in 1905 — a war which weakened Russia and strengthened the Bolsheviks. Commodore Perry’s daughter was married to the European-born Jew August Belmont(born August Schönberg — Rothschild’s openly known US agent who became head of the Democrat National Committee in 1860. Though a northerner, Belmont was later suspected of trying to undermine Lincoln and the Union during the Civil War. Yes indeed. The flow of history took some nasty and bloody turns because of those “cherries and milk!” 

* Conspiracy Theory: The same secret society networks  — quite likely connected (at the highest levels) to the “usual suspects” running the tumultuous 1848 secessionist movements of Europe & Latin America — realized that the tough Taylor was willing to smash — by military force if necessary — their southern “nationalist” scheme to split the United States in two. So (((they))) poisoned him to death.

1. Like General Jackson before him, son-of-the-South General Taylor was also ready to use force to hang secessionists. / 2. Taylor’s grave-site: Louisville, Kentucky. // Cherries & milk, eh?

At the urging of a researcher and with the permission of Taylor’s descendants, his body was exhumed in 1991 and tested for arsenic poisoning only. The results were negative, but no test for any other forms of poison were performed.

Some establishment Fake Historians now speculate that Harrison, Polk & Taylor were all killed by “bad water supply” flowing to the White House. Evidently, the “bad water” knew to kill only presidents, but not their wives, children, servants, staff etc.

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