University Of Pittsburgh Harvested Organs Of Live Babies Based On Race

According to internal documents, the University of Pittsburgh harvested organs of live babies based on their race.

by Patrick Hauf

university of pittsburgh harvested organs of live babies based on race

The federal government gave at least $2.7 million in taxpayer money to researchers who sought out minority babies who had been aborted in order to harvest their organs, according to internal documents (pdf) released Tuesday.

The University of Pittsburgh targeted minorities in its request for infant organs — including those taken from full-term babies — to create a “pipeline” for fetal research.

Researchers said they needed 50 percent of the donated fetuses to be minorities and specified that 25 percent must come from black women. The Pittsburgh metropolitan area is 85 percent white and 8 percent black.

Researchers stressed the importance of maintaining organ blood flow in the request, which watchdogs say could violate federal law by asking doctors to illegally preserve organs during labor-inducing abortions.

The National Institutes of Health has overseen experiments on fetal organs at the University of Pittsburgh since 2015 in what the school claimed to be a “tissue hub.”

Aborted babies used in this research ranged from 6 to 42 weeks of gestation, according to government documents.

The grant request from the university to the government agency redacts key information, including how many fetuses were obtained and who provided them. Its language, however, raised troubling questions.

David Daleiden, founder and president of the pro-life Center for Medical Progress, called on the federal government to investigate the NIH and Pitt after obtaining more than 300 pages of information related to the program through a public records request.

“The experiments with aborted infants at the University of Pittsburgh, sponsored by the NIH, are like Kermit Gosnell’s house of horrors, but this time funded by the federal government,” Daleiden told the Washington Free Beacon.

“It was systemic bias and abortion extremism that permitted Gosnell to evade the law for so long, and the same thing is happening in Pittsburgh. These atrocities deserve the full response of law enforcement and government officials — law enforcement should put a stop to it and arrest the perpetrators.”

The fetal research focused on harvested kidneys. The University of Pittsburgh said fetuses should have minimized “warm ischemic time” — a medical term to describe the time that an organ is without blood flow. It also lists “labor induction” as a utilized abortion procedure to obtain the organs.

“There’s the distinct possibility that some of these babies are born alive and then their organs and tissues are removed,” Dr. David Prentice, vice president and research director of the pro-life Charlotte Lozier Institute, told the Free Beacon.

“This is horrific — almost medieval. It is certainly antiquated science.”

Federal law bans the purchasing of aborted fetuses, which must be donated for research. It is illegal to request how donated fetuses are to be aborted.

A university spokesman said researchers played no role in the “timing, method, or procedures used to terminate the pregnancy.”

“In this case, ischemia time refers to the time after the tissue collection procedure and before cooling for storage and transport. It does not have an impact on how the procedure is performed, which is always at the discretion of the attending physician,” the university said in an email.

The spokesman also said “projects funded by the National Institutes of Health must ensure appropriate inclusion of women and minorities” and that the study’s racial distribution was appropriate.

One of the study’s goals, he said, was “to support researchers looking for treatments and cures for kidney disease,” which disproportionately afflicts minorities.

Federal officials released the records 17 months after Daleiden’s initial request — and only after the activist enlisted the help of attorneys with the government watchdog Judicial Watch.

Meredith Di Liberto, the lead attorney on the case, said further information about the program is required to find definitive proof of illegal behavior, but the redactions leave many unanswered questions.

“We keep getting this pushback that ‘Oh, it’s not illegal’ — but it’s all done behind closed doors with redactions,” Di Liberto told the Free Beacon.

“If this is all legit, why did we have to fight so hard to get a document, and when we get them, they’re redacted? Why did we have to go to court to see who’s paying for this?”

The University of Pittsburgh has been involved in fetal organ research for more than a decade. It conducted an experiment in 2020 that implanted the scalps of aborted fetuses onto lab mice in a study that was funded by Dr. Anthony Fauci’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The grant proposal boasts of the institution’s experience handling a variety of fetal organs, including the liver, heart, legs, brain, kidneys, and bladders.

The university outlined its goal of becoming a “pipeline” for fetal organ research, which would mean not only conducting this research but providing organs for other institutions to experiment on.

“You see words like ‘we have a sample’ and ‘subdivided,’ and it’s like, well, we’re talking about a human being,” Di Liberto told the Free Beacon. “It’s a little Frankenstein-ish”.

Terry Schilling, president of the American Principles Project, said voters must hold their representatives accountable to ensure government funding goes nowhere near experiments on aborted fetuses.

“This latest discovery that millions of taxpayer dollars have apparently been funding this same barbaric practice through NIH is nothing short of outrageous and should profoundly trouble the conscience of every American,” Schilling told the Free Beacon.

“Congress should act to ensure that any future funding of NIH be explicitly barred from going toward such inhumane practices, and any lawmaker who opposes such action should be forced to answer for it to their voters.”

The documents redacted the identity of the provider, but the university has longstanding partnerships with Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania as a “contracted care site” and shares some senior-level staffers.

Dr. Beatrice Chen, for example, serves as both the medical director for Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania and the director of family planning at the University of Pittsburgh.

Local Planned Parenthood staffers admitted to providing aborted fetuses to the University of Pittsburgh in an undercover video released by the Center for Medical Progress in 2019:

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania has denied that any of their three facilities participate in fetal organ donation programs.

Satanic Temple Sues Texas For ‘Right’ To Practice A Kind Of Child Sacrifice Called ‘Abortion Ritual’

The Satanic Temple (Sick Fuckers) has what it calls an “abortion ritual” — and it’s now suing the state of Texas for the right to perform this “religious” ceremony unimpeded.

satanic temple sues texas for 'right' to practice a kind of child sacrifice called 'abortion ritual'

Filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division on behalf of Satanic Temple member “Ann Doe,” the suit alleges that “certain state-mandated abortion regulations violate the religious liberty of its members,” reports the Dallas Observer.

“They say regulations, such as those that require women seeking an abortion to undergo a sonogram and examine the results, read about abortion and sit-out a mandatory waiting period, violate the temple’s religious teachings.”

“It’s legal to get an abortion in Texas,” the site continues.

“But the procedure is banned after 20 weeks unless a life-threatening medical condition is involved or the fetus has a severe abnormality. If a person is eligible, the state requires them to get a sonogram and receive paperwork about medical risks, adoption alternatives and developmental stages of the fetus.”

“The state then requires a woman to wait 24 hours after receiving the sonogram and paperwork before she can go through with the abortion,” the Observer further informs.

“The day-long wait is not required if for those who live 100 miles or more away from the nearest abortion provider.”

The Satanic Temple claims that these restrictions interfere with its “abortion ritual,” which it says Ann Doe performed. At its website (no, I won’t provide the link), it calls the ritual “a ceremonial affirmation of self-worth and bodily autonomy that integrates the abortive process.”

Prior to filing its suit, the Satanic Temple’s attorney had “sent a letter to the Texas Health and Human Services Commission” demanding “an exemption from the abortion restrictions on behalf of Ann Doe,” the group’s website also relates.

The “requirements are a precondition to Ms. Doe’s ability to participate in a religious ceremony,” the group further claims.

“It is a substantial interference per se for the state to place a regulatory hurdle — one that costs money — in front of a religious exercise. The state might as well tax and regulate Mass.”

(Actually, it had already regulated Mass, at least on a temporary basis, via COVID-19 restrictions.)

As for the “abortion ritual,” the Satanic Temple writes that it “(1) requires an abortion; and (2) affirms her [the mother’s] religious subscription to TST’s [The Satanic Temple’s] Third and Fifth Tenets.”

These tenets state, respectively, “One’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone”; and “Beliefs should conform to one’s best scientific understanding of the world. One should take care never to distort scientific facts to fit one’s beliefs.”

When performing the ritual, a Satanic Temple member “will look at her reflection, be reminded of her personhood and responsibility to herself, take deep breaths, focus on her intent and make herself comfortable,” writes the Observer.

“When ready, she will say the third and fifth tenet of the temple aloud.”

After the baby is killed, the Satanic Temple member “would return to her reflection and cite her personal affirmation: ‘By my body, my blood. By my will, it is done,’” the Observer also relates.

The Satanic Temple had filed two lawsuits in Missouri in recent years that were similar to its Texas effort and had lost. Yet the group’s co-founder and spokesman Lucien Greaves claims that “it wouldn’t be accurate to say we lost in a way that would have challenged the legitimacy of our legal arguments.”

While I don’t know if this is accurate, there are, lamentably, dark parallels between the Satanic Temple’s beliefs and mainstream prenatal infanticide advocates — and our law itself.

Consider that the Satanic Temple emphasizes the woman’s will, “By my will, it is done,” while prenatal infanticide advocates proclaim “My body, my choice!” — even when that choice is murder. But since a “choice” is made via exercise of will, “pro-choice” is another way of saying “pro-my will.”

Then consider our schizophrenic prenatal infanticide law. A man may be charged with a double-murder if he kills a pregnant woman. Yet if that woman had lived and decided to kill her unborn baby, it would be considered her right and might be called “termination of an unviable tissue mass.”

This irrationality isn’t hard to understand: Much as with the antebellum constitutional provision deeming a slave three-fifths of a person, our prenatal infanticide laws reflect political compromise, not moral principle. And compromise often leads to contradiction. For rightness and rationality aren’t determined by majority vote.

The point, however, is that our law also deifies the woman’s will. When she’s with child and wants the baby, he’s considered human and wholly inviolable; when she doesn’t, he’s considered something subhuman (like a slave) that can be discarded. Her will be done. Thus is “deifies” not too strong a word, for such power over life and death is to be reserved to God.

But transferring it to man is a Satanic Temple goal. “Thyself is Thy Master. Hail Satan!” is the group’s apparent motto, prominently displayed on its website.

Oh, the Satanic Temple claims to be “non-theistic” and thus, ostensibly, considers Satan a sort of metaphor. It’s said, however, that the “Devil’s cleverest wile is to convince us he doesn’t exist.”

For being “thy own master” may suffice to advance evil. As we sometimes learn in life if touched by wisdom, after all, following our own will invites disaster. This is often because when we do so, we’re not actually following our will — it’s just that we’re not following God’s, either.

Source: TheNewAmerican.com