Arms Transfers to Ukraine. Detailed Overview of Deliveries, Timeline…

As tensions mounted in late 2021 and into 2022 concerning a Russian invasion of Ukraine, many countries announced arms transfers to Ukraine. As the invasion began in late February, this resource page was launched to track developments related to such transfers, which thus far includes pledges and/or deliveries from more than 25 countries plus the European Union. 

Overview of pledged and/or delivered weapons (see timeline below for more details and links)[1]

  • Australia:  M113 armored personnel carriers, Bushmaster protected mobility vehicles, missiles, and weapons – AUD $285 million ($200 million), six M77 155mm howitzers, four 14 M113AS4 Armored Personnel Carriers; drones and 34 armored vehicles (valued $68 million)
  • Belgium:  200 anti-tank weapons and 5,000 automatic rifles/machine guns
  • Canada: 8 armored vehicles, M777 howitzers, 4500 M72 rocket launchers and up to 7500 hand grenades, 20,000 155mm artillery shells, as well as $1 million dollars for the purchase of commercial satellite high resolution and modern imagery​, machine guns, pistols, carbines, 1.5 million rounds of ammunition, sniper rifles, and various related equipment ($7.8 million), plus additional $20 million in military aid (CAD $25 million – details undisclosed)– CAD $118 million total (as of April 22) — and an additional CAD $500 million on May 8 (undefined), 39 armoured combat support vehicles (ACSVs)
  • Croatia:  rifles and machine guns, protective equipment valued at 124 million kuna (€16.5 million)
  • Czech Republic: T-72 tanks and infantry fighting vehicles; attack helicopters (Mi-24); rocket systems; 400 million koruna ($18.23 million) of non-light weapons, including 160 shoulder-fired MANPADS systems (probably 9K32 Strela-2), 20 light machine guns, 132 assault rifles, 70 submachine guns, 108,000 bullets, 1,000 tactical gloves, all worth 17 million crowns ($756,000), and an earlier 188 million koruna ($8.6 million) worth of 4,000 mortars, 30,000 pistols, 7,000 assault rifles, 3,000 machine guns, a number of sniper rifles, and one million bullets. 
  • Denmark: Harpoon anti-ship launcher and missiles, 2,700 anti-tank weapons, 300 Stinger missiles (returned to United States to be made operational), protective vests
  • Estonia: Javelin anti-tank missiles; nine howitzers (with German permission)
  • European Union:  €2 billion for military supplies, €500 million in military aid
  • Finland: 2,500 assault rifles and 150,000 cartridges for them, 1,500 single-shot anti-tank weapons, and combat ration packages
  • France: MILAN anti-tank guided missile systems and CAESAR artillery howitzers, plus “additional defense equipment,” 6 CAESAR howitzers (June)
  • Germany:  50 Cheetah anti-aircraft systems, 56 PbV-501 IFVs, 1,000 anti-tank weapons and 500 Stinger anti-aircraft defense system, plus permission for select other countries to send weapons controlled by Germany, three M270 Mittleres Artillerie Raketen System (MARS) launchers and GMLRS ammunition, 100 tank howitzers, 16 Biber bridge-layer tanks (official page)
  • Greece: portable rocket launchers, ammunition, and Kalashnikov rifles
  • Ireland: 200 units of body armor, medical supplies, fuel, and other non-lethal aid
  • Italy: Cabinet approved transfer of military equipment, pending Parliamentary approval.- reported to include Stinger surface-to-air missiles, anti-tank weapons, heavy machine guns, MG-type light machine guns and counter-IED systems
  • Japan: bulletproof vests, helmets, and other non-lethal military aid
  • Latvia: six 155mm self-propelled Howitzers, four helicopters, Stinger anti-aircraft missiles
  • Lithuania: Stinger anti-aircraft missile systems and ammunition, M113 and M577 armored personnel carriers and ammunition
  • Luxembourg: 100 NLAW (Next Generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon), Jeep Wrangler 4×4 vehicles, 15 military tents, and additional non-lethal equipment
  • Netherlands: 200 Stinger missiles, 3000 combat helmets and 2000 fragmentation vests with accompanying armor plates, one hundred sniper rifles with 30,000 pieces of ammunition, plus other equipment; 400 rocket-propelled grenade launchers (with German permission), heavy weapons, self-propelled howitzers, armoured vehicles
  • North Macedonia: unspecified military equipment, unspecified number of soviet-era tanks
  • Norway: 100 Mistral air defense missiles, 4,000 anti-tank weapons, helmets, bulletproof vests, other protection equipment, 22 M109 155m tracked self-propelled howitzers and related materials, three MLRS long-range rocket artillery (joint donation with UK)
  • Poland: 200+ T-72 tanks, other approved delivery of Piorun (Thunderbolt) short-range, man-portable air defense (MANPAD) systems and munition; Defense Minister expressed readiness to supply several dozen thousand rounds of ammunition and artillery ammunition, air defense systems, light mortars, and reconnaissance drones, three Krab 155m self-propelled howitzer squadrons (worth $700M)
  • Portugal: grenades and ammunition, G3 automatic rifles, and other non-lethal equipment
  • Romania: €3 million of fuel, bulletproof vests, helmets, ammunition, military equipment, and medical treatment
  • Slovakia: S-300 air defense system, eight self-propelled Zuzana 2 howitzers.
  • Slovenia: T-72 tanks (reported), undisclosed amount of Kalashnikov rifles, helmets, and ammunition
  • Spain: 1,370 anti-tank grenade launchers, 700,000 rifle and machine-gun rounds, and light machine guns, 20 tons of medical supplies, defensive, and personal protective equipment composing of helmets, flak jackets, and NBC (nuclear-biological-chemical) protection waistcoats
  • Sweden: 10,000 AT4 anti-tank weapons, helmets, and body shields; anti-tank weapons and machine guns (valued $40 million)
  • Turkey: co-production of Bakar Bayraktar TB2 armed drones​
  • United Kingdom: anti-aircraft capabilities (Stormer), 10,000 short-range and anti-tank missiles (including NLAWs and Javelins), Saxon armored vehicles, Starstreak air defence systems, loitering munitions, radar, heavy lift drones — with aid at £200 million, to rise to as high as £500m as of April 25 (note: on April 8, reports indicated aid already at £350 million)– on May 2, an additional £300 million announced, M270 multiple-launch rocket systems (quantity to be announced), $1.2 billion (air defense systems and other technologies), three MLRS long-range rocket artillery (joint donation with Norway); 50,000 artillery shells, artillery guns, drones, anti-tank weapons, additional MLRS, precision guided M31A1 missiles
  • United States: Howitzers and artillery rounds; laser-guided rocket systems; Switchblade, Puma, and Counter-Unmannered Aerial systems​; about 700 Phoenix Ghost Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems; counter-artillery radars; 16 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) and HIMARS ammunition; eight Surface-to-air Missile Systems (NASAMS); 1400 Stinger and 8500 Javelin missiles; 20 Mi-17 helicopters; ​anti-armor systems, small arms and various munitions; more than 59 millions rounds of small arms ammunition; body armor; hundreds High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs). Total $13.5 billion in security aid since the Biden Administration began, as of August 24, 2022. Factsheet (August 24)

Select Timeline

2022

August

Image: Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System. (Photo by Soldatnytt, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System.jpg

On Wednesday, August 24, the United States announced $2.98 billion in additional security assistance to Ukraine including National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems (NASAMS) and ammunition, 155mm and 120mm Howitzer ammunition, unmanned aerial systems and more (see official press release).

On Friday, August 19, the United States announced $775 million in additional security assistance to Ukraine including more HIMARS, 105mm Howitzers and artillery ammunition, Javelin and other missiles, and Humvees (see official source).

On Tuesday, August 16, Latvia clarified that it had deliver six 155mm self-propelled Howitzers in accordance with a July 28 decision, and had on August 15 announced the delivery of four helicopters – two Mi-17 and two Mi-2 to Ukraine. (see official source)

On Thursday August 11, the United Kingdom pledged to give Ukraine more MLRS and a “significant number” of precision guided M31A1 missiles (see official source).

On Monday August 8, the United States announced $1 billion in additional security assistance to Ukraine including more ammunition for HIMARS and 155mm artillery ammunition (see official press release).

On Monday August 1, the United States announced $550 million in additional aid to Ukraine including additional ammunition (see US Department of Defense).

July

On Friday July 29, Germany announced the donation of 16 Biber bridge-layer tanks to Ukraine on top of the recent howitzer announcement (see media). North Macedonia announced they would send soviet-era tanks of an unknown quantity to Ukraine (see media).

On Wednesday July 27, Germany announced a sale of 100 tank howitzers to Ukraine, reportedly worth 1.7 billion euros (see news).

On Friday, July 22, the United States announced $270 million in additional security assistance for Ukraine (see US Department of Defense newsfactsheet).

On Thursday July 21, the United Kingdom announced they would send 50,000 artillery shells, artillery guns, drones, and more anti-tank weapons to Ukraine numbering the hundreds (see UK government resource). Lithuania announced it would send M113 and M577 armored personnel carriers and ammunition to Ukraine (see media source).

On Wednesday July 20, the United States announced four more additional HIMARS would be sent to Ukraine, totalling 16 HIMARS sent to Ukraine by the United States (see US Department of Defense news).

On Monday July 18, the European Union announced an additional 500 million euros in military aid to Ukraine (see media source).

On Monday July 11, Netherlands Prime Minister stated they would provide “heavy weapons, armored vehicles and self-propelled howitzers” to Ukraine (see news).

On Friday July 8, the United States announced $400 million in aid to Ukraine. This drawdown package included four additional HIMARS, precision artillery rounds, 126 155mm Howitzers, 20 Mi-17 helicopters, and numerous other munitions, systems, and other materials (see Department of Defense factsheetnews, and press release). ​

On Monday July 4, upon a visit to Kyiv, Australia’s Prime Minister announced they would pledge $68 million to Ukraine, which would include drones and 34 armored vehicles (see media source). 

On Friday July 1, the United States announced an additional $820 million to Ukraine. This aid is set to include HIMARS ammunition, two Surface-to-air Missile Systems (NASAMS), four counter-artillery radar systems, as well as 155m artillery ammunition (see US Department of Defense press release).

June

Image: GDLS Armored Combat Support Vehicles (ACSV) (Photo by MilitaryLeak)

GDLS Armored Combat Support Vehicles (ACSV)

On Thursday June 30, Sweden announced they would send additional anti-tank weapons as well as machine guns valued at $49 million (see media source). Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, announced at the NATO summit in Madrid Canada would send thirty-nine armoured combat support vehicles (ACSVs) (see media source).

On Wednesday June 29, the United Kingdom and Norway announced a joint donation of initially three MLRS long-range rocket artillery (see Norwegian government statement).

On Wednesday June 29, the United Kingdom announced an additional $1.2 billion to Ukraine to support defense including air defense systems and other defense equipment and technology (see media source).

On Thursday June 23, US President Joe Biden authorized an additional $450 million drawdown to Ukraine (See U.S. Department of Defense news).

On Monday June 20, Australia announced it would send four 14 M113AS4 Armored Personnel Carriers to Ukraine (see media source).

On Thursday June 16, French President Macron announced France would send six more Caesar long-range self-propelled howitzers to Ukraine (see media source).

On Wednesday June 15, more than 50 countries pledged more military aid to Ukraine at the Ukraine Defense Contact Group according to the U.S. Secretary of Defense (See U.S. Defense Department news). The United States announced a $1 billion security assistance package to include multiple launch rocket system munitions, 18 more 155 mm M777 towed howitzers and the tactical vehicles to tow them, and 36,000 rounds of 155 mm ammunition. (See Defense Department announcement.) Germany’s Minister of Defense announced a transfer of three M270 Mittleres Artillerie Raketen System (MARS) launchers and GMLRS ammunition from Bundeswehr stocks to Ukraine. (See joint statement from United States, Germany, and United Kingdom)

On Wednesday June 8, Norway announced that they have donated 22 M109 155mm tracked self-propelled howitzers. Alongside this, Norway included other relevant materials such as gear, parts, ammunition with the howitzers (See official government press release). Poland announced they will sell Ukraine three Krab 155m self-propelled howitzer squadrons reportedly worth $700M (See English and Polish Media). 

On Monday June 6, the United Kingdom announced that they will send M270 multiple-launch rocket systems to Ukraine. The exact number remains unknown, however, the BBC reports that there will be three of these systems (See BBC).

On Thursday June 2, Slovakia indicated a commercial deal with Ukraine to send eight self-propelled Zuzana 2 howitzers. This announcement was made by the Defense Ministry (See media source).

On Wednesday June 1, the United States Department of Defense authorized a Presidential Drawdown of military assistance worth $700 million, making the total value of US military assistance to Ukraine $5.3 billion since the start of the Biden Administration. Notable weapons in this package include; High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems and ammunition, five counter-artillery radars, two air surveillance radars, four Mi-17 helicopters and more. (See Department of Defense resource). German Chancellor, Olaf Scholz, additionally promised an air defense system as well as a tracking radar system to Ukraine from Germany (See New York Times and German resource).

May

On Tuesday May 31, United States President Biden said in a New York Times op-ed “I’ve decided that we will provide the Ukrainians with more advanced rocket systems and munitions that will enable them to more precisely strike key targets on the battlefield in Ukraine…. We will continue providing Ukraine with advanced weaponry, including Javelin anti-tank missiles, Stinger antiaircraft missiles, powerful artillery and precision rocket systems, radars, unmanned aerial vehicles, Mi-17 helicopters and ammunition,” with indications that the “advanced” weaponry would include multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS) that Ukraine had agreed not to use to strike into Russia. (See  New York Times and other media.)    Olaf Scholz, German Chancellor, announced that Germany “will provide Greece with German infantry fighting vehicles,” with the presumption that older Greek military vehicles would be transferred to Ukraine. Soviet-style BMP IFVs are one of the reported Greek weapons that would be transferred to Ukraine. (See media source.)

On Tuesday, May 24, Canada‘s Defense Minister indicated that it will donate 20,000 155mm artillery shells. (See official government resource page and media.)

On Monday, May 23, during a press conference after the second Contact Group meeting, U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said “I’m especially grateful to Denmark, which announced today that it will provide a Harpoon launcher and missiles to help Ukraine defend its coast. I’d also like to thank the Czech Republic for its substantial support, including a recent donation of attack helicopters, tanks and rocket systems.  And today, several countries announced new donations of critically needed artillery systems and ammunition, including ItalyGreeceNorway and Poland.” (See transcript and Defense Dept news.) Media reports indicate the attack helicopters from the Czech Republic were Soviet-designed Mi-24s (see Wall Street Journal and Air Recognition).  The European Union adopted two measures under the European Peace Facility (EPF) to create a “fourth tranche [that] will add €500 million to the resources already mobilised under the EPF for Ukraine, thereby bringing the total amount to €2 billion.” (See EU press release.)

By the Numbers: Keeping Track of the Single Largest Arms Transfer in US History

On Saturday, May 21, United States President Joe Biden sign the $40 billion Ukraine supplemental appropriations act into law. (See White House notice and official legislation.)

Image: Mountain howitzer firing (Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

On Thursday, May 19, the United States announced an additional $100 million drawdown for Howitzers and counter-artillery radar. (See Defense Department statement.)   Australia announced an additional  AUD$60.9 million in new support for Ukraine including 14 M113 Armoured Personnel Carriers and a further 20 Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles. (See Defense Minister Dutton’s website.)

On Monday, May 9, U.S. President Joe Biden signed the Ukraine Democracy Defense Lend-Lease Act of 2022 into law, giving him abilities to lend equipment to Ukraine (See White House noteremarks, and Defense Department factsheet on all security assistance as of May 10.)

On Sunday, May 8, The Canadian Prime Minister announced that the additional $500 million for further military aid to Ukraine announced “has begun to roll out” (See official government resource page.)

On Friday, May 6, the United States announced another $150 million drawdown for assistance, including 25,000 155 mm artillery rounds, 3 counter-artillery radars, and other spare parts and field equipment. (See official President statement and Pentagon statement.)

On Monday, May 2, United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced  £300 million in new aid including radars, heavy lift drones, and thousands of night vision devices. (See official transcript.)

April

On Thursday, April 28, U.S. President Joe Biden asked Congress for an additional $33 billion for Ukraine-related efforts, including  $5 billion in additional drawdown authority, $6 billion for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative, and $4 billion for the State Department’s Foreign Military Financing program. (See White House factsheet.)

On Tuesday, April 26, more than three dozen countries met in at Ramstein air base in Germany to discuss Ukraine, with U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin thanking Germany for committing to send 50 Cheetah anti-aircraft systems and Canada eight armored vehicles. (See U.S. Defense Dept official transcript.) Australia announced they would send six M777 155mm howitzers to Ukraine (see news). 

On Monday, April 25, Poland announced that it had delivered tanks to Ukraine (see media) that later stories indicated was 200+ T-72 tanks, plus previously included infantry fighting vehicles and missiles for MiGs. (See media.) The United Kingdom announced it would send additional anti-aircraft capabilities (See U.S. Defense Dept official transcript and media and additional media)

On Sunday, April 24, the United States Secretary of State declared an emergency need to sell $165 million in ammunition via the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program, bypassing Congressional review. (See official notification.)

On Friday, April 22, Canada announced that it had delivered M777 howitzers and associated ammunition, with commitments since January 2022 of more than $118CAD million (see official release). In a media interview. President Emmanuel Macron confirmed that France provided MILAN anti-tank guided missile systems and CAESAR artillery howitzers. (See media.) Media reported that Slovenia would deliver T-42 tanks to Ukraine in exchange for Germany to give Slovenia Marder and Fuchs tanks. (See media.

On Thursday, April 21, the United States authorized another $800 million in security assistance, including seventy-two (72) 155mm Howitzers and 144,000 artillery rounds. This brings US military assistance to Ukraine to more than $4 bllion, $3.4 billion of which has been committed since the invasion. (See official release.)

On Wednesday, April 20, Norway announced it would donate 100 Mistral air defense missiles (See official story.)

On Wednesday, April 13, the United States authorized an additional $800 million in security assistance to Ukraine. This brings US military assistance to Ukraine to more than $3 billion. (See official press statement and release.) 

On Friday, April 8, Slovakia announced that is has provided Ukraine with its S-300 air defense system after preliminary agreeing to do so if a replacement system was secured. (See media and Prime Minister of Slovakia tweet.) The United Kingdom announced an additional £100 million in aid to include more than 800 NLAW anti-tank missiles, Javelin anti-tank systems, loitering munitions, Starstreak air defence systems, and additional non-lethal aid. (See official news story.)

On Tuesday, April 5, the Czech Republic became the first country to send tanks to Ukraine, including T-72 tanks and armored personnel carriers. (See media.) The United States announced an additional $100 million for anti-armor systems to Ukraine. This additional security assistance under the Biden administration brings the U.S. security commitment to Ukraine to more than $2.4 billion. (See official press statement.) 

On Friday, April 1, the DoD announced it will provide up to $300 million in security assistance to Ukraine, including Laser-guided rocket systems, Switchblade, Puma, and Counter-Unmannered Aerial systems, and more capabilities. (See release.)
Media reported that the United States would facilitate the transfer of Soviet-made tanks to Ukraine, as an intermediary for unnamed countries. Germany also approved the sale of dozens of infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) formerly belonging to East Germany to Ukraine, according to media.

March

On Thursday, March 31, the Norwegian government announced its delivery of 2,000 M72 light anti-armor weapons to Ukraine following an earlier shipment of the same weapons. (See official website.)

On Wednesday, March 30, President Biden informed President Zelenskyy of the United States‘ intent to provide $500 million in direct budgetary aid that media reported the Ukrainian government could use for military purposes. (See official readout). In an interview with NPR, Sen. Bob Casey revealed that “another 2,000 [Javelins] are on the way” to Ukraine along with 800 Stingers; this follows an earlier delivery of 2,600 Javelin and 600 Stinger missiles. 

On Saturday, March 26, the United States announced its intent to provide $100 million in civilian security assistance, including armored vehicles and field gear. (See official press release.)

On Thursday, March 24, Boris Johnson announced the United Kingdom will provide a package of 6,000 missiles, including anti-tank and high explosive weapons, and £25 million in financial backing for the Ukrainian military. (See official press release.Sweden also announced it will send an additional shipment of 5,000 AT4 anti-tank weapons. (See local media.)

On Thursday, March 17, in a joint news conference with Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Slovakia Minister of Defense Jaroslav Nad’, the Minister preliminarily agreed to send S-300 strategic air defense systems to Ukraine on the condition Western allies provide Slovakia with a “proper replacement” to avoid a “security gap” within NATO. (See joint news conference video.)

On Wednesday, March 16, following an address by Ukraine’s president to the United States Congress, President Biden promised $800 million in additional weapons, including 800 Stinger anti-aircraft systems; 2,000 Javelin, 1,000 light anti-armor weapons, and 6,000 AT-4 anti-armor systems, as well as restated previously supplied five Mi-17 helicopters and 70 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs). (White House factsheet). Media indicated that the transfers would also include Switchblade drones.

On Monday, March 14, Irish Minister for Defence Simon Coveney approved to provide 10 tonnes of ready-to-eat meals (MRE), 200 units of body armor, medical supplies, fuel, and other non-lethal aid in line with Ireland’s policy of military non-alignment. (See official press release and local media.)

On Saturday, March 12, the United States approved another $200 million in arms transfers, reported to include Javelin antitank missiles and Stinger antiaircraft missiles. (White House notification and media.)

On Wednesday, March 9, Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby said the United States will not send fighter jets to Ukraine.

On Tuesday, March 8, Poland offered to donate its MiG jets to the United States, for it to transfer them to Ukraine. (Poland’s official website and media). Feasibility and timing of this plan unclear, with indications that the Pentagon did not see as feasible (Pentagon statement). Minister of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Hayashi Yoshimasa, signed a grant to provide Ukraine with bulletproof vests, helmets, and other non-lethal military aid. (See official press release.)

On Monday, March 7, U.S. Senator Bob Menendez, chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, sent a letter to President Biden encouraging the United States to facilitate European countries transferring fighter aircraft to Ukraine. (A day earlier, U.S. officials indicated their support for Poland to do so, according to media interviews.)

On March 6, Antony Blinken stated that the United States has given “the green light” to Poland to send fighter jets to Ukraine, according to a media interview. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield said that discussions regarding the possibility of the United States providing fighter jets to Poland and other NATO allies are still ongoing, according to media

On Saturday, March 5, Ukraine’s President Zelinsky met with member of the U.S. Congress via Zoom and asked for additional fighter jets and a no-fly zone, according to media.

On March 3, according to media, Defense Minister Kajsa Ollongren said the Netherlands will no longer publicly share specific details about arms deliveries to Ukraine. The United Kingdom’s House of Commons Library published a reportdetailing military assistance to Ukraine from many countries. Canada announced its intent to provide 4500 M72 rocket launchers and up to 7500 hand grenades, as well as $1 million dollars for the purchase of commercial satellite high resolution and modern imagery, according to an official news release. The Czech Republic also authorized the transfer of 20 light machine guns, 132 assault rifles, 70 submachine guns, 108,000 bullets, 1,000 tactical gloves, all worth 17 million crowns ($756,084) (see resolution 160 on the Czech Government website). 

On March 2, Ukraine’s Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov posted on Facebook that “New bayraktars have already arrived in Ukraine and are on combat duty. There will be more stingers and javelins.” Spain also announced it will send a shipment of 1,370 anti-tank grenade launchers, 700,000 rifle and machine-gun rounds, and light machine guns directly to Ukraine (see media.)

On March 1, Australia said “it will provide around $70 million in lethal military assistance to support the defence of Ukraine, including missiles and weapons.” (Approx $50 million, see official press release, and related media.) New statements from multiple officials drew into question whether EU countries will be providing fighter jets to Ukraine. (See NATO/Poland statement, and media reporting.) At a House Armed Services Committee hearing in the United States, officials confirmed that Stinger missiles and many other U.S. weapons had been delivered since September (see video, approx 41 minute mark). In early March, Ukraine also received a shipment of Turkish-made Bakar Bayraktar TB2 armed drones according to a Facebook post made by Ukraine’s Minster of Defense. 

February

On February 28, Finland said it would deliver 2,500 assault rifles, 150,000 cartridges for the attack rifles, 1,500 single-shot anti-tank weapons and 70,000 combat ration packages. (Ministry of Defense press release.) Norway decided to donate up to 2,000 M72 anti-tank weapons. (Government press release.) Media reported that the Italian cabinet recommended the transfer of military equipment to Ukraine, pending Parliamentary approval, reported to include Stinger surface-to-air missiles, anti-tank weapons, heavy machine guns, MG-type light machine guns and counter-IED systems. Croatia will send rifles and machine guns, plus protective equipment sufficient for four brigades valued at 124 million kuna (€16.5 million), said Defence Minister Mario Banožić. (Government tweet, see also media.Canada committed another 25 million in undefined military aid ($20 million USD, Canadian government.) Deputy Prime Minister François Bausch also announced Luxembourg will provide Ukraine with lethal and non-lethal equipment including 100 NLAW (Next Generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon), Jeep Wrangler 4×4 vehicles, 15 military tents, as well as logistical and financial support. (See official press release.) The North Macedoniangovernment also announced its decision to donate unspecified military equipment to Ukraine (see media).

On Sunday, February 27, the European Union said it would “purchase and delivery” weapons to Ukraine. EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said this will be done via the European Peace Facility for € 500 million and include “…arms and even fighter jets. We are not talking just about ammunition; we are providing the most important arms to go to war. Minister Kuleba has been asking us that they need the type of fighter jets that the Ukrainian army is able to operate. We know what kind of planes and some Member States have these kinds of planes.”  (EU statements and transcripts.) According to media reportsBelgium‘s Prime Minister Alexander De Croo indicated it would send an additional 3,000 automatic rifles and 200 anti-tank weapons (on top of 2000 machine guns announced a day earlier). According to media, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen announced that Denmark will donate 2,700 anti-tank weapons to Ukraine. It will also return parts for 300 Stinger missiles to the United States for possible future donation to Ukraine (see additional media). Sweden‘s Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson said her country will send 5,000 anti-tank weapons, helmets and body shields, plus 135,000 field rations. (See official government tweet and other media.Norway decided to send 1,500 bulletproof vests, 5,000 helmets and other equipment (which appears to have been delivered February 28, Government press release, media.)The government of Greece delivered portable rocket launchers, ammunition, and Kalashnikov rifles according to local media. (See Minister of Defence tweet). According to local media, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic Petr Fiala announced an additional 400 million koruna ($18.23 million) of “not light weapons” including 160 shoulder-fired MANPADS systems (probably 9K32 Strela-2) with equipment (total price 38.5 million crows), and the rest is unknown (see Prime Minister’s tweet and resolution 137 on the Czech Government website); this follows an earlier shipment of 4,000 mortars, 30,000 pistols, 7,000 assault rifles, 3,000 machine guns, a number of sniper rifles, and one million bullets worth 188 million koruna ($8.6 million). In addition, the Spanish government has sent 20 tons of medical supplies, defensive, and personal protective equipment composing of helmets, flak jackets, and NBC (nuclear-biological-chemical) protection waistcoats to a Polish airport close to the Ukrainian border. (See official Spanish government website and tweet.) In a tweetPortugal said it would provide “military equipment such as vests, helmets, night vision goggles, grenades and ammunition, portable radios, analogue repeaters, and G3 automatic rifles, as well as hospital support” (see also media). In a press statement, Government spokesperson Dan Cărbunaru announced that Romania would send €3 million consisting of fuel, bulletproof vests, helmets, ammunition, military equipment, and medical treatment. 

On Saturday, February 26, Germany indicated it would send lethal military aid to Ukraine. This includes 1,000 anti-tank weapons and 500 Stinger anti-aircraft defense systems; plus permission from Germany for the Netherlands to send 400 rocket-propelled grenade launchers and Estonia nine howitzers. (See official tweet, and media reports.) Separately, it was announced that the Netherlands agreed to send 200 Stinger missiles, and 50 Panzerfaust 3 anti-tank weapons (see media, official letter). In a tweetBelgium‘s Prime Minister said his country would supply 2000 machines guns. According to mediareports, France’s President Emmanuel Macron indicated that his country would “deliver additional defense equipment to the Ukrainian authorities as well as fuel support” without given specific weapon details. Denmark‘s armed forces indicated that trucks had left the day prior to deliver 2000 protective vests and related equipment.

On Friday, February 25, U.S. President Joe Biden authorized $350 million in security assistance for Ukraine. (White House memorandum.) press statement from Secretary of State Anthony Blinken on February 26 indicated “This brings the total security assistance the United States has committed to Ukraine over the past year to more than $1 billion.” A Department of Defense statement indicated it would include “anti-armor, small arms and various munitions, body armor, and related equipment in support of Ukraine’s front-line defenders facing down Russia’s unprovoked attack.” Media later reported this will also include Stinger anti-aricraft missiles.

On Thursday, February 24, Russia launched an invasion of Ukraine, which it called a “special military operation.”

On Wednesday, February 23, a second shipment of Canadian military aid was received in Ukraine.

On Tuesday, February 22, Latvia was scheduled to deliver Stinger anti-aircraft missiles to Ukraine after a Latvian foreign ministry spokesperson informed Reuters the evening of Monday February 21. Media reported that Belgium had thus far refused requests for helmets and other supplies.

On Monday, February 21, Defence Minister Matej Tonin revealed that Slovenia had delivered an undisclosed amount of Kalashnikov rifles, helmets, and ammunition to Ukraine, according to local media.

On February 18, the Republic of Estonia delivered Javelin anti-tank missiles to Ukraine. (Republic of Estonia’s Ministry of Defence) The Netherlands announced a plan to provide “3000 combat helmets and 2000 fragmentation vests with accompanying armor plates, thirty metal detectors and two wire-guided detection robots for (sea) mine detection, two battlefield surveillance radars and five weapon location radars, and one hundred sniper rifles with 30,000 pieces of ammunition.”

On Monday, February 14, Prime Minister Trudeau announced that Canadian officials had authorized $7.8-million worth of arms transfers, described as “lethal equipment and ammunition” to Ukraine. The transfers were to include “machine guns, pistols, carbines, 1.5 million rounds of ammunition, sniper rifles, and various related equipment.” (Canadian Ministry of Defense. See additional reporting.)

On February 12 and 13, Lithuania delivered Stinger anti-aircraft missile systems and ammunition to Ukraine as part of its continuing military assistance. (Ukrainian Ministry of Defence)

Image: Bayraktar TB2 Runway (Photo by Bayhaluk, licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0)

Bayraktar TB2 Runway.jpg

In early February, Turkey and Ukraine agreed to coproduce Turkish-made Bayraktar TB2 drones. Ukrainian Defence Minister Olesii Reznikov informed reporters in Kyiv that Ukrainian pilots would be trained in the coproduction compound. This agreement follows sales of these drones to Ukraine in 2019, which Ukraine has deployed in Donbas in recent months.

On February 1, Poland approved the delivery of Piorun (Thunderbolt) short-range, man-portable air defense (MANPAD) systems and munition; Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki stated that Poland is ready to supply “several dozen thousand rounds of ammunition and artillery ammunition, air defense systems, and also light mortars and reconnaissance drones.” (See media.) Poland has functioned as a logistical hub for countries sending military aid and equipment from sending countries and dispatching them to Ukraine.

January

On January 26, Canada announced it would transfer non-lethal military aid to Ukraine. (Canadian Ministry of Defense)

On January 20, the United States State Department issued a revised factsheet on security assistance to Ukraine; as the United States also directly delivered military assistance to the country. This included some of a $200 million in Department of Defense stocks, a drawdown that was authorized in December 2021. The factsheet detailed that since 2014, the United States had provided $2.7 billion in training and equipment, and particularly highlighted “the 2018 sale of 210 Javelin anti-armor missiles, which has provided Ukraine with a critical anti-armor capability; the 2019 sale of 150 additional Javelins; and the 2020 Mark VI patrol boats sale” (see notifications). The U.S. also permitted U.S.-origin equipment to be transferred from regional allies. 

In January, Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht claimed Germany wants to “de-escalate” the crisis and will not supply weapons to Ukraine, but will instead co-finance 5.3 million euros for a military field hospital. In cooperation with Germany, Estonian Defence Forces were organizing a 13-day training course for Ukrainian military medical instructors provided by the Estonian company Semetron. (Embassy of Estonia in Kyiv)

In mid-January, the United Kingdom supplied 2,000 short-range and anti-tank missiles, Saxon armored vehicles, as well as British specialists to deliver training in Ukraine.

2021

December 

In December 2021, Lithuania sent its first delivery of military aid composed of bulletproof vests and ballistic belts to Ukraine since the beginning of the crisis. 

*

Civil Society 

Select Media Articles

Additional Data

TIV (Trend Indicator Value) of major arms exports to Ukraine (2016-2021), from SIPRI database. See file (overview) and trade register of specific items transferred.

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The Occult History of the U.S. Military’s PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

A video produced by the 4th PSYOP hints at the various ways mass media is used to wage psychological warfare on the public. Here’s a look at this symbolic video and the strange (occult) history of PSYOPS.

The goal of PSYOP is, essentially, to mess with people’s minds. Appropriately enough, a recent recruitment video by the 4th PSYOP Group accomplished just that. Posted on the official social media accounts associated with the U.S. Military, the video titled Ghosts in the Machine gained some viral traction as viewers were impressed with the video’s production quality … while being baffled by its overarching message and symbolism.

What does it all mean? To better understand this video, let’s look at the fascinating yet secretive world of PSYOPS.

PSYOPS

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PSYOPS stands for “psychological operations”. It can be defined as:

“Planned psychological activities using methods of communications and other means directed to approved audiences in order to influence perceptions, attitudes, and behavior, affecting the achievement of political and military objectives”.

When books describe PSYOPS, they often refer to WWI-era strategies such as dropping leaflets from a plane to demoralize the enemy. That era is long gone. PSYOPS moved way beyond these primitive methods to adopt highly sophisticated techniques utilizing the latest technologies and the immense power of mass media.

But that is not all. There was always a “magical”, supernatural element to PSYOPS.

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In my 2011 article “Top 10 Most Sinister PSYOP mission patches“, I highlighted the omnipresent “magical” element found in several PSYOP mission patches.

These allusions to magic are not merely figurative. PSYOPS extensively researched occult and supernatural phenomenons such as ESP (extra-sensory perception) and remote viewing.

This symbiotic relationship between PSYOPS and the occult is fully personified by an important yet controversial figure: Michael Aquino.

Michael Aquino and MindWars

LTC Michael Aquino e1652289185567 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

Lieutenant Colonel Michael A. Aquino.

report this adMichael Aquino joined the U.S. Army in 1968 where he became an officer specializing in psychological warfare and, later, a Lieutenant colonel in military intelligence.

As Aquino climbed the ranks of the U.S. military, he also climbed the ranks of another organization: The Church of Satan.

“Michael Aquino began corresponding with Anton LaVey while a psychological operative for the U.S. Army, stationed in the jungles of Vietnam. Aquino returned to the States and was soon made a high-ranking priest and editor of the church’s Cloven Hoof newsletter. His distinctive appearance — he sported a prominent widow’s peak and darkly accented eyebrows — was further enhanced by a small 666 tattooed on his scalp.”
– Washington Post, A Devil of a Time

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Aquino doing satanic things.

As years passed, the relationship between Aquino and LaVey deteriorated. The main reason: LaVey believed that Satan was a symbolic force while Aquino believed in the literal existence of Satan. In 1975, Aquino founded the Temple of Set – an occult order that revolved around an Egyptian deity on whom the Hebraic Satan was supposedly based.

Aquino’s occult activities did not interfere with his military career. In fact, he described politics and propaganda as forms of “lesser black magic”.

Aquino divided black magic into two forms: lesser black magic and greater black magic. He stated that lesser black magic entails “impelling” things that exist in the “objective universe” into doing a desired act by using “obscure physical or behavioral laws” and into this category he placed stage magic, psychodramas, politics, and propaganda.
– Jesper Aagaard, “The Seeds of Satan: Conceptions of Magic in Contemporary Satanism”

In 1980, as a “PSYOP Research & Analysis Team Leader”, Aquino c0-authored MindWar – an internal U.S. Army paper about the future of psychological operations. While this document was only intended for the eyes of government policymakers, it accidentally became public. And it caused quite a stir.

“Is the government involved in invasion of the mind beyond the blundering, haphazard legacy of the infamous MKULTRA experiments? Even more unsettling, do such efforts extend beyond conventional scientific research to dark and arcane arts whose very existence is the stuff of legend?”
– MindWar book description

The least one can say is that MindWar was visionary. It accurately predicted the 4th generation of warfare which focuses on bypassing armies in order to “attack population, culture, and institutions”. And the best way to accomplish this was, of course, through mass media.

“In its strategic context, MindWar must reach out to friends, enemies and neutrals alike across the globe – neither through primitive “battlefield” leaflets and loudspeakers of PSYOP nor through the weak, imprecise, and narrow effort of psychotronics – but through the media possessed by the United States which have the capabilities to reach virtually all people on the face of the Earth.

These media are, of course, the electronic media – television and radio. State of the art developments in satellite communication, video recording techniques, and laser and optical transmission of broadcasts make possible a penetration of the minds of the world such as would have been inconceivable just a few years ago.”
– Michael A. Aquino and Paul E. Valley, “MindWar”

The ultimate goal of MindWar is to make people willingly do what they’re supposed to do, while not realizing they’ve been pushed towards that decision at every step of the way.

“For the mind to believe in its own decisions, it must feel that it made those decisions without coercion. Coercive measures used by the operative, consequently, must not be detectable by ordinary means. There is no need to resort to mind-weakening drugs such as those explored by the CIA; in fact the exposure of a single such method would do unacceptable damage to MindWar’s reputation for truth.”
– Ibid.

Towards the end of this short document, Aquino goes way beyond mass media. He states that PSYOPS must make full use of phenomenons such as electromagnetic fields and Extremely Low-Frequency Waves (ELFs) to make people more suggestible to MindWar.

“There are some purely natural conditions under which minds may become more or less receptive to ideas, and MindWar should take full advantage of such phenomena as atmospheric activity, air ionization and extremely low frequency waves.”

ELF waves up to 100Hz are naturally occurring, but they can be produced artificially (such as for the Navy’s Project Sanguine for submarine communication). ELF-waves are not normally noticed by the unaided senses, yet their resonant effect upon the human body has been connected to both physiological disorders and emotional distortion. Infrasound vibration (up to 20 Hz) can subliminally influence brain activity to align itself to delta, theta, alpha or beta wave patterns, inclining an audience toward everything from alterness to passivity. Infrasound could be used tactically, as ELF-waves endure for great distances; and it could be used in conjunction with media broadcasts as well.”
– Ibid.

You’ve read correctly: Aquino stated that ELFs can be used in conjunction with media broadcasts.

2RNM The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

My article 2018 “Government Files About Remote Mind Control” reviews leaked official documents about altering brain waves.

With all of that being said, let’s take another look at this PSYOP recruitment video.

Ghosts in the Machine

The recruitment video by the 4th PSYOP Group revolves around the saying “All the world’s a stage” – a quote from William Shakepesear which compares the world to a play and people to actors. However, in the context of PYSOP, this quote takes on a deeper meaning: Many of the events we see around the world are staged and choreographed by unseen puppet masters.

Appropriately enough, the video begins with the words:

“Have you ever wondered who’s pulling the strings?”

ghosts8 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

A puppet-master pulling the strings.

This creepy figure appears throughout the video without revealing himself. However, his silhouette looks familiar.

ghosts9 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

Left: Creepy figure. Right: Aquino.

The video subtly hints at the various “battlefields” of PYSOP using clever shots.

ghosts1 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

“Warfare is evolving and all the world’s a stage”. In the background, we see images of people filming propaganda and a person playing the piano. Because the music industry is involved in psychological warfare.

ghosts2 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

The video features multiple scenes of people scrolling their phones because Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google, Reddit, and others are MindWar battlefields.

ghosts5 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

An old-timey cartoon shows a bumbling clown being revealed as a ghost (aka a spook).

The message of this highly symbolic image: Your ridiculous entertainers are actually agents of propaganda.

ghosts3 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

A clown-like entertainer (similar to one seen in the cartoon) gets ready to perform as the words “we come in many forms” are displayed.

ghosts4 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

A shot of an empty movie theatre indicates that the entertainment industry is fully involved in psychological warfare against citizens.

ghosts6 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

Throughout the video, we see images of protests and political movements. 

The message of these scenes: These events did not happen organically, they were the result of psychological warfare. As Aquino wrote:

“For the mind to believe in its own decisions, it must feel that it made those decisions without coercion.”

In Conclusion

Ghosts in the Machine is a cleverly made recruitment video that appears to target a specific audience: “Conspiracy-minded” people … who want to take part in the conspiracy. Through various symbolic scenes, the video explains how the 4th PSYOP Group uses psychological warfare to defend American interests in foreign conflicts – especially those involving China and Russia. With that being said, a vital question begs to be asked: Is psychological warfare used against American citizens and allied countries?

At the time of PSYOP’s inception, laws were created to prevent the military from conducting psychological warfare on U.S. citizens. However, Aquino himself observed that the 2003 Iraq invasion was preceded by an “extreme MindWar on American people”.

While it is possible that the 4th PSYOP Group is focused on foreign adversaries, psychological warfare is currently being used by all kinds of state and non-state actors. In the 21st century, globalist forces control mass media and political parties. As such, this powerful elite group has been conducting an unprecedented MindWar effort to “attack population, culture, and institutions”. It is happening right before our eyes.

ghosts7 The Occult History of the U.S. Military's PSYOPS and its Highly Symbolic Recruitment Video

All the world’s a stage.

Soldiers Fight Back Against Military’s Upcoming Vaccine Mandate By Filing Lawsuit Against Pentagon

The Department of Defense will require all U.S. military troops to take the COVID-19 vaccine by September 15th. The Associated Press earlier reported on Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin’s memo.

by Kyle Becker

Great Reset: World Economic Forum Declares the ‘Age of Human Robots Is Over’

The AP reported that “the deadline could be pushed up if the vaccine receives final FDA approval or infection rates continue to rise.”

“I will not hesitate to act sooner or recommend a different course to the President if l feel the need to do so. To defend this Nation, we need a healthy and ready force,” the Defense Secretary added.

An Armed Forces member refusing to take the vaccine is subject to punishment under the U.C.M.J., the AP’s report noted. The punishment for refusal to obey an order may escalate up to court martial.

“Some unvaccinated service members have suggested they’d get the shot once it’s required, but others are flatly opposed,” the report said.

Now, some of those ‘flatly opposed’ soldiers are filing a lawsuit in court against the coming military vaccination mandate.

Those listed on the lawsuit as defendants are Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, Secretary of Health & Human Services Xavier Becerra, and Janet Woodock, Acting Commissioner of the Food & Drug Administration.

“Plaintiffs Staff Sergeant Daniel Robert, U.S. Army, and Staff Sergeant Holli Mulvihill, USMC, individually and on behalf of all other similarly situated active duty, National Guard, and Reserve servicemembers, as documented survivors of COVID-19, file this action against the Department of Defense (“DoD”), seeking a declaratory judgment that the DoD cannot force them to take a COVID-19 vaccination under existing military regulations, federal regulations, federal law, and the U.S. Constitution,” the plaintiffs’ legal complaint states.

“The Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin (the “SECDEF”) has publicly notified Plaintiffs, via Memo, that he will seek authorization from the President of the United States of America (the “President”), to mandate the COVID-19 vaccine on or about September 15, 2021,” the plaintiffs note.

“Upon information and belief, the DoD is already vaccinating military members in flagrant violation of its legal obligations and the rights of servicemembers under federal law and the Constitution.”

“Army Regulation 40-562 provides documented survivors of an infection, a presumptive medical exemption from vaccination because of the natural immunity acquired as a result of having survived the infection,” the legal complaint added.

“General examples of medical exemptions include the following… Evidence of immunity based on serologic tests, documented infection, or similar circumstances,” the lawsuit cites.

“Plaintiffs also seek a declaratory judgment on the separate basis that the Emergency Use Authorization (“EUA”) DoD COVID-19 Vaccine mandate, which they have been notified is imminent, cannot be issued in violation of 10 U.S.C. §1107 [U.S. Code] and its implementing regulations, including DoD Directive 6200.2, the FDA regulation of biologics at 21 C.F.R. § 50 et seq., as well as the law regarding informed consent 50 U.S.C. 1520 (‘The Nuremburg Code’),” the lawsuit added.

Legal analysts cite prior situations that suggest that legal challenges to the COVID vaccine order may fail in court.

“Legally, vaccines under emergency use authorization require service members to grant ‘informed consent’ to receive one, which they are allowed to withhold,” U.S. News reports.

“The law states a president may override that concern in the ‘interests of national security,’ according to an analysis from Duke University’s Lawfire blog in February.”

Robert Sanders, chair of the National Security Department at the University of New Haven, pointed to the case of troop vaccination to protect them from anthrax.

A follow-on case found such orders did not violate troops’ constitutional rights because, “The requirement to place the needs of the nation above a service member’s personal welfare applies in peacetime as well as in war.”

Professor Sanders gave his assessment of legal challenges to the military vaccination order. “I believe such challenges will fail on the merits under the history of the anthrax vaccine’s military litigation,” he said.

The plaintiffs are also submitting in their lawsuit expert testimony from Dr. Peter McCullough, M.D., who is board certified in internal medicine and was the Chief Fellow at William Beaumont Hospital.

In addition to being a cardiologist, he also holds a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the University of Michigan. He is currently a Professor of Medicine at Texas Christian University and the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center School of Medicine.

The relevant portion of the doctor’s testimony is submitted in text image format below:

doctor testimony covid 19

“To put it concisely and bluntly, people who have naturally created antibodies resulting from contracting and recovering from the Virus should not receive any inoculation against the virus or any family or variant thereof becuase it will do more harm than good,” Dr. McCullough is testifying.

The Pentagon has yet to formally issue the vaccine mandate, but the order is expected to be issued in September.

Source: BeckerNews.com