Emperor’s most loyal warrior: The Japanese soldier who never surrendered to the US

Sgt. Shoichi Yokoi kept on fighting for Japan for decades. His nephew told RT the story of his duty.

Emperor's most loyal warrior: The Japanese soldier who never surrendered to the US
Holding an Imperial Navy flag, a Japanese veteran leads others to offer prayers for the country’s war dead at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, 15 August 2005

For the rest of the planet, World War II ended in 1945, but, for one foot soldier in the Imperial Japanese Army, it kept on going for another 28 years.

It was early evening on January 24, 1972, when two CHamoru hunters checking their fish traps in the Talo’fo’fo river that winds through the jungle on the Pacific island of Guam were startled by a wild-looking, barefooted man bursting out of the undergrowth in front of them.

Clearly as surprised as they were, the stranger flung aside the handmade fish trap he was carrying and attempted to seize one of the hunters’ rifles. But he was easily overwhelmed, subdued, and forced to accompany the pair back to their village, where one of the most extraordinary stories of the 20th century began to slowly unfold.

The man who appeared from nowhere in the evening gloom 50 years ago was Sergeant Shoichi Yokoi of the Imperial Japanese Army’s 38th Division. His last contact with the outside world had been 28 years previously, after US forces had regained control of the island from Japan, and, in the eight years prior to his encounter with the CHamoru men, he hadn’t spoken a single word to another human being. He was one of three Japanese hold-outs who had evaded capture, and the last to survive, hiding out in a cave and hunting by night.

This week, on the eve of the 50th anniversary of Sgt. Yokoi’s apparent return from the dead, his nephew, Omi Hatashin, whom the older man had treated like the son he had never had, spoke exclusively with RT.com.Read more Let’s dump the Nobel Peace Prize. With a roll call of winners featuring terrorists and warmongers, it’s lost all its credibility

Speaking from Osaka, where he is a university lecturer in modern history and human rights, Professor Hatashin dismissed the mythology of the soldier who would never surrender that has since been created around his uncle and, instead, painted a poignant picture of a man desperate to belong to a family and instilled with a deep sense of humanity towards his comrades.

When Hatashin was just six years old, only a few months after he had reappeared in Guam and then returned to Japan, Yokoi had married Mihoko, the boy’s aunt. Yokoi was 56 years old at the time and his bride was 44.

The sergeant’s extraordinary story began on 31 March, 1915, when he was born in the city of Nagoya, where he was raised by his mother and stepfather.

In 1941, at the age of 26, while he was working as an apprentice tailor, he was conscripted into the Imperial Army and sent to serve in the 29th Division in Manchuria, in northeastern China. He spent three years working in logistics, where he was loathed by his fellow infantrymen, who considered the logistics personnel ‘soft’ and a burden to ‘real’ fighting men. 

Prof. Hatashin recalls: “The Imperial Japanese Army really treated logistics very poorly. There was a saying that logistics men were inferior to horses and bulls in terms of physical strength, and so they were below animals in terms of status.

But because of the dire circumstances the army found itself in, with a shortage of soldiers towards the end of the war, especially in defending Guam, the Japanese administration decided that all the logistics men must be furnished with more ammunition and should fight as soldiers. All the other infantry found this very offensive, asking, ‘Why do we have to fight in the same ranks as logistics men? They’re inferior to us!’ So, there was a very bad relationship between the men.”

In February 1944, as Japan sought to shore up its defenses in Guam, the former US territory it had occupied for three years, Sgt. Yokoi was ordered to be ready to ship out. He was told he was to be deployed to a secret destination, and was hastily bundled aboard a troop carrier with no idea what lay ahead. That ship was headed for Guam.Read more The US bombed Japan in 1945 to demonstrate its power to the USSR. Intimidation, NOT deterrence was, is and always will be the goal

Despite its small population of 20,000, the island was of huge strategic importance. Japan seized it in December 1941, starting with an air attack on the capital, Hagåtña, just a few hours after its assault on the US fleet in Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, around 3,800 miles away. 

In just three days, the Imperial Army overran the US possession, launching a massacre that left 600 dead and ensured the locals loathed the occupying force for the remainder of the occupation. This was the milieu into which Sgt. Yokoi landed in February 1944. He was immediately assigned to the supply corps of the Japanese naval garrison. 

The Americans, outraged by the bombing of Pearl Harbor and shocked at being chased off Guam, had regrouped, however. In July that year, in a bid to recapture Guam, they launched one of the most devastating pre-assault naval bombardments of World War II. In the face of 55,000 US soldiers, the Japanese were soon defeated.

As the fighting raged around Sgt. Yokoi, he became separated from his platoon – he had been suffering terribly from diarrhea and had been in the latrine – and when he went to rejoin his men, they were nowhere to be found.

RTShoichi Yokoi © Wikipedia

But he wasn’t alone. The Japanese ranks were in disarray, so Yokoi hooked up with a ragtag collective of nine soldiers under the command of an officer who had once been a Buddhist monk.

The officer really wasn’t interested in fighting,” Prof. Hatashin said, “So, they looked for a way to build a raft and escape from Guam, where they hoped to be rescued by the Japanese Navy, or even the Americans.”

Although the loose-knit squadron continued to attack American positions under cover of darkness, the lack of food and disagreements over tactics led to a rift and the group disbanded, leaving Yokoi and two comrades, Shichi Mikio and Nakahata Satoshi, to tough it out as a trio. 

Prof. Hatashin said that, at one point, the three men had attempted to surrender, but they had been met with such hostility from the people of Guam, who remembered the savagery of the invaders, that he and his two comrades had fled for their lives, vowing never to approach the locals again. So great was their fear of retribution that they stuck to that decision even in 1952, when they came across leaflets declaring that the war was over.

As time passed, their decision to stay together came under strain and Yokoi decided to live separately in his own underground shelter, but still close enough to his two comrades that they could commune with each other if the mood took them.READ MORE: Japan holds drills in case ‘foreign forces’ invade disputed islands

His new home consisted of an L-shaped hole seven feet below ground, about three feet high and nine feet long, supported by bamboo canes and accessed through a narrow, concealed opening via a bamboo ladder. The floors and walls were covered with bamboo, and he had even built an indoor toilet. He lived on shrimp, fish, eels, toads, rats and wild pig, foraging coconuts, breadfruit, and papayas from the surrounding jungle, and moving from his hideaway only at night to avoid detection.

While he existed separately from Mikio and Satoshi, they were not estranged, and when, sometime in 1964, he realized he hadn’t seen his neighbors for some time, he went to find them. Prof. Hitashin said his uncle had told him that, on entering their cave, he had struggled to find his way around in the dark, but his foot had struck an object that then rolled across the ground. When he managed to light a flame to investigate, he found it was a human skull. His comrades were dead. This crushing realization was as bitter a blow as any for Yokoi. 

Despite later reports that they had died when their cave had been flooded, Prof. Hatashin said the devastation caused by Typhoon Karen, which struck Guam in 1962, had created long-lasting and severe food shortages that had made it difficult for the soldiers to forage or hunt for sustenance. The fact that their remains had been found in the cave led some to speculate that a buildup of carbon monoxide in their cramped underground home could have been the culprit.

For Yokoi, the loss of his companions must have hurt. Prof. Hatahsin said, “Throughout his life he had been terribly lonely, but it became clear that these two guys who lived in a hole in the ground in Guam had become his familyHe was emotionally devastated, but somehow he convinced himself that he had a duty to report the death of the two guys back to Japan. He thought somebody must tell the government about this tragedy. In that way, he persuaded himself to survive.

Yokoi’s mission was his salvation. It carried him through the final eight years of his isolation. He later admitted to his nephew that his sole purpose in staying alive was reporting the loss of his two comrades to his military superiors in order that their families could finally grieve. He made good on that promise to himself on his return to Japan, making his way to the homes of both soldiers to confirm the men had died.

Although Yokoi’s sense of duty, both as a soldier and as a man, never left him, the nation he served failed to reward his sacrifice. Prof. Hitashin says his uncle had officially been declared dead in 1947 and, as a result, his pay and pension had ceased at that point. Unbeknown to him, in the jungle of Guam, Sgt. Yokoi was fighting Japan’s enemies on behalf of his homeland entirely on his own. Read more US military under fire for commemorating WWII battle anniversary with photo of Nazi war criminal

While much has been made of the Imperial Japanese Army’s military code of conduct and its sense of honor that demanded death before surrender – which many have wrongly suggested was the reason for Sgt Yokoi’s determination to stand his ground – Prof. Hatashin said this was not a true reflection of the reality of war. 

He said the Japanese officers on Guam captured by the Americans readily surrendered to save their own skin – something that had irritated his uncle no end when he finally returned home and learnt that some of the senior officers who had served in Guam had handed themselves over to the enemy, eventually returned to Japan, and lived a comfortable life thereafter among family and friends.

Prof. Hatatshin recalls: “Mr Yokoi himself said that the colonels who surrendered and lived happily back in Japan never wanted to see him back alive.” His courage in the face of adversity was in stark contrast to their own behavior and what many believed the uncompromising military leadership had expected of them.

After all, under the iron rule of Emperor Hirohito, surrender was not an option. Prof. Hatashin said the official line was that if Japan had been defeated in Guam, it must have been because every Japanese soldier fighting there had been killed in battle. A soldier of the Imperial Army did not surrender to his foe.

But that’s not what happened. “In reality, some people actually surrendered and returned to Japan,” he said. “Some were found suffering from lack of food or from illness by the Americans, and these people became prisoners.”

To fit the official narrative, and to avoid any uncomfortable questions about leaving men behind, any soldiers unaccounted for following the devastating battle on the island were simply pronounced dead, so Yokoi’s mother was told her son had perished.

It was decided that every soldier had died in battle, even if they didn’t have any evidence for it,” said the professor. 

While the unexpected reappearance of Sgt Yokoi in 1972, after 10,000 days, might have embarrassed the military hierarchy, on his return to Tokyo, he was welcomed as a hero by an adoring public who admired the humility of his first public words: “It is with much embarrassment that I return.”

It was that admission, viewed through the prism of Japan’s strict military code of conduct, that some believed revealed that Sgt. Yokoi somehow felt he had failed his nation by finally being captured. But the reality was very different. He was wracked by survivor’s guilt, Prof. Hatashin said. Nightmares pursued him. He told his nephew his sleep was haunted by the dead he’d left behind, who were pursuing him through the island jungle, pleading, “Please bring us back with you!

Over time, jealousies also arose. Japanese casualties on Guam totaled around 18,000 and relatives of some of those who failed to return took against Sgt. Yokoi. He received anonymous calls from relatives late at night, demanding to know how he had survived for so long when their loved ones had perished. At one point, he received a cut-throat razor in the post, its implied suggestion being that he do with it what the Americans and years of isolation in the jungle of Guam had failed to achieve.

While he lived out his years peacefully in Japan giving lectures and interviews about his extraordinary life, the ex-soldier did later visit Guam with his new wife, at her insistence. She was curious to see the conditions in which her husband had survived for 28 years. Mihoko Yokoi has long survived her husband, and today, aged 94, lives in Kyoto.

Certainly, Sgt. Yokoi’s years of living literally hand to mouth paid off existentially, but, sadly, not financially. With no military pension, his later life was austere, but endurance was something he encouraged among his fellow Japanese, even writing a book titled, ‘You Need to Live with More Difficulties’.

Before he died of a heart attack in 1997, at the age of 82, Sgt. Yokoi’s final words to his nephew epitomized a man to whom family and loyalty were vitally important. Speaking of his uncle’s two comrades, whose bodies had long since been claimed by the jungle of Guam, Prof. Hitashin said, “He told me he wished the three of them could have returned together.”

https://www.rt.com/news/547064-shoichi-yokoi-soldier-japan-wwii/

How the Spanish-American War Changed World History

SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR

High School history fables taught us that the Spanish-American War of 1898 was a meaningless war instigated by the Yellow Journalist William Randolph Hearst. Here’s a typical history-book sample of the retarded drivel that is still being spoon-fed to captive audiences of dumbed-down students who are even awake to hear it:

“It is arguable that the Spanish-American War was perhaps the most pointless war in the history of the United States. Although it was not known at the time, the war was not truly fought for territory, for markets, for principle, or even for honor. Rather, it began because William Randolph Hearst, editor of the popular New York Journal sought sensational material to print.”

Certainly, Hearst and his rival at the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer, helped to poison the public mind towards Spain. But this idiotic and incomplete analysis ignores the “big picture” of the Globalist hand which moves the chess pieces. The Spanish-American War was neither “pointless”, nor insignificant. To the contrary, without the precedent-setting features, tactical acquisitions, and adverse side-effects of this unjust war, and the prolonged US-Philippines War which grew out of it, World War I, the Bolshevik Revolution, World War II and all the other horror stories of the past 100 + years would not have been possible.

Intrigued? Keep reading.

1- As outrageous and essential as their propaganda was, the belief that a newspaper circulation rivalry between Hearst and Pulitzer caused the war, as the first cartoon above suggests, is just as moronic. // 2- The shocking claim of Spaniards strip-searching American women was false.

As the turn of the century approached, America was strong, independent, and what the Globalists would call “isolationist” – a stupid propaganda term used to mock the desire to maintain peaceful commerce and neutral relations with foreign countries. The very thought of picking a fight overseas was as foreign to the American psyche as homosexual “marriage” or government housing.

The Globo-Zionist crime gang was not nearly as entrenched among the American elite as it is today, but the pernicious influence of the Globalists was indeed growing fast. Money Masters such as Jacob Schiff, John D Rockefeller, Rothschild front-man JP Morgan and others were already on board with the Globalist movement; as were media moguls like Adolph Ochs (NY Times), and the aforementioned Hearst and Pulitzer. America’s potential as a global ‘hit-man’ for the N.W.O. was not lost upon these One Worlders, particularly in regard to establishing a menacing naval presence from which the emerging U.S. bully could influence the affairs of Asia. Thus was born the idea for the first “Asian pivot” – the theft of the Spanish colonies of Guam and the Philippines.

The “problem” of overcoming American “isolationism” posed a challenge for the Globalists. Americans wanted as much to do with the affairs of the Asia Pacific as they did those of Mars or Venus. Besides, Spain wasn’t about to give away territories which it had benevolently ruled for more than three centuries. Concurrent with the desire to take Guam and the Philippines was a movement to annex Hawaii and make it an American territory. But in 1897, the annexation movement stalled due to the strong opposition of native Hawaiians and the inability of supporters to win a 2/3 majority in the U.S. Senate. What’s a Globalist to do?

1- Location. Location. Location. The stepping-stones of Hawaii, Spanish Guam & Spanish Philippines would enable the U.S. to project a presence in Japan’s backyard, with proximity to China and far eastern Tsarist Russia as well. //  2- Rothschild, Rockefeller and Jacob Schiff (above) had long range plans to control Asia.

It just so happened that the Spanish colony of Cuba was located only 90 miles off the coast of Florida. What if, using the pretext of “Spanish tyranny” over Cuba, the U.S. could pick a fight with “evil” Spain in America’s own backyard? The public might not get too excited about “oppressed” Spanish subjects 5,000 miles away, but certainly, the good and decent American people would never allow the poor freedom-seekers of nearby Cuba to be so oppressed by a European monarchy and get a nice treasure out of it as well, “Puerto Rico”.

And what if, using the cover of this oh-so-noble war for “Cuban liberation,” the U.S. could then chase the Spaniards out of the Asian Pacific and establish its own bases? Can you see the scam now? Toward these ends, a baseless propaganda campaign was suddenly unleashed against Spain, with Hearst and Pulitzer taking the lead in the press while certain U.S. Senators and Congressmen worked from inside DC.

Although the intensive propaganda campaign of 1897 and early 1898 had succeeded in poisoning the public perception of Spain, the reluctance to go to war of many in Congress, as well as that of the conservative President, William McKinley, still had to be overcome. Can you smell the false-flag event coming?

President McKinley was not impressed by the anti-Spanish propaganda. Some further “persuading” had to be done.

In 1897, The Globalist “Powers That Be” had arranged for the ambitious control-freak, New York City Police Commissioner Theodore Roosevelt, to be appointed as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. In February of 1898, TR, on his own initiative, ordered the USS Maine to provocatively sail into Cuba’s Havana Harbor (controlled by Spain). In a remarkable “coincidence”, the Maine “spontaneously” and oh-so-conveniently blew up, killing 251 American sailors. TR and the Yellow Press wasted no time in blaming Spain for the “mine attack.”

Assistant Naval Secretary Roosevelt murdered 251 sailors and then blamed Spain for it.

Spain strongly denied the false charges and invited an investigation into the matter. President McKinley continued to resist the demands and threats of the Congressional warmongers and the Yellow Press. But by April, the pressure for war was just too much for McKinley to resist. On April 25, 1898, America declared war upon Spain — a war whose rallying cry was: “Remember the Maine and to hell with Spain.”

Neither the Pope, nor the innocent Spaniards, nor the U.S. President were able to beat back the insane war mania and press propaganda which followed the destruction in the Maine.

Immediately after the war declaration, “Assistant” Secretary Roosevelt again took matters into his own hands by issuing an order for America’s Asiatic Squadron – stationed in British Hong Kong in order to “protect commerce” – to destroy the Spanish fleet based in the Philippines. Try not to laugh, dear reader; but Americans on the west coast were told that this outrageous act of aggression was a necessary defensive strike aimed at preventing a Spanish attack on California! The Battle of Manila Bay took place on May 1. It was a rout. Commodore Dewey not only destroyed the Spanish fleet, but also captured the harbor of Manila – effectively a U.S. body of water ever since.

On June 20, a U.S. fleet commanded by Captain Henry Glass, captured the island of Guam – a U.S. territory ever since. And finally, in July, the House and Senate worked their way around the 2/3 Senate requirement for annexing Hawaii by voting on a joint resolution instead. The “emergency” of the war is what finally enabled the establishment of a huge base in Hawaii (Pearl Harbor).

Philippines, Guam, Hawaii; yes, the war with Spain turned out to be very good for the future conquerors of Asia. Hey Teddy! Wasn’t this holy war supposed to be about “liberating” Cuba?

The war for “Cuba’s freedom” was really all about controlling Asia.

The totally lopsided war ended in August, after just 3 and 1/2 months. But not before the war’s most important instigator, Teddy Roosevelt, stepped down from his position and volunteered to “fight.” The grand-standing clown served just long enough to build his resume as a “war hero.” His mythical achievements as the fearless, horse-mounted leader of the “The Rough Riders” and “hero of San Juan Hill” would be hyped by the very same Yellow Press which propagandized for the phony war in the first place. In reality, the Battle of San Juan Hill was only a minor skirmish, fought on foot, in which Americans outnumbered Spaniards 15-1!

Just three months after the war had ended, Roosevelt was elected Governor of New York State. He had campaigned vigorously on his puffed-up war record, winning the election by just 1%. Then, as now, dumb Americans loved their “war heroes.”

The following year, 1899, McKinley’s Vice President, the equally conservative and pro-“hard money” Garret Hobart, conveniently died of a “heart ailment” (or poison?) at age 55. The same warmonger / “progressive” faction that had imposed the Spanish-American War upon McKinley, would now impose Roosevelt upon the reluctant President McKinley. In 1900, after an astonishingly rapid climb up the political ladder, the fiendishly ambitious TR was just “a heartbeat away” from the Presidency.

1- Idiotic false propaganda turned TR into an instant “war hero” //  2- Vice President Garret Hobart (r) died suddenly. Was he poisoned to make way for TR? // 3- With TR just “a heart beat away” from power, the Globalists need only to kill the conservative McKinley.

In September of 1901, President McKinley was assassinated by Leon Czolgosz, a Red terrorist-anarchist and devotee of the New York Anarchist-Communist Jew, Emma Goldman. How convenient! Pinko-Progressive Teddy Roosevelt became President and immediately began accelerating the process of converting America towards socialism at home and imperialism (New World Order) abroad.

TR waged a brutal war against the ex-Spanish colony of the Philippines. During TR’s war of aggression, 5,000 Americans and 20,000 Filipinos were killed, with as many as 100,000 more natives dying of disease. This was the Philippine independence movement’s reward for rising up against Spain, based on America’s empty promises. The formerly Spanish-speaking natives were then converted to the English language, which they speak to this day.

1- A Red’s bullet put a “Progressive” into the White House. //  2- Under TR’s reign of terror, Philippine rebels were tortured. // 3-  Cartoon mocks TR and the Banksters as being fans of Karl Marx.

In 1903, irritated by Colombia’s request for better terms for what was to become the Panama Canal, TR ordered a fake revolution in Colombia. The result was the newly formed puppet state of Panama. Colombia got screwed out of lease payments!

In 1905, TR, with Asian-Pacific naval bases now in hand, brokered a peace deal between Russia and Japan. Jacob Schiff’s money and TR’s anti-Russian peace deal helped to weaken the Tsar, who would be overthrown by murderous Reds in the decade to come. For this contribution towards anti-Russian Globalism, war-loving TR was awarded the phony Nobel Peace Prize!

In 1907, the megalomaniac TR sent “The Great White Fleet” to sail around the world as a show of intimidation.

In 1908, one year after the Bankster-engineered Panic of 1907, TR established the “National Monetary Commission” to study the crash and make suggestions. Nelson Aldrich, an in-law of the Rockefellers, was named Chairman. The NMC suggested the establishment of a Central Bank for America – which will eventually come into being in 1913 as “The Federal Reserve.”

This is how Bankster puppet TR rolled. Both personally and politically, he was a classic bully and a fake “man of the people” who set the precedents which many other Presidents would follow for the next 100 years. Great American author and essayist Mark Twain described TR as follows:

“Mr. Roosevelt is the Tom Sawyer of the political world of the twentieth century; always showing off; always hunting for a chance to show off; in his frenzied imagination the Great Republic is a vast Barnum circus with him for a clown and the whole world for audience; he would go to Halifax for half a chance to show off and he would go to hell for a whole one.”

Yes, indeed, TR did quite a bit of damage to America and, by extension, the world; and none of it would have been possible were it not for the Spanish-American War which created him, after he had created it.

1- Psycho TR’s ‘Great White Fleet’ – USA! USA! USA! // 2- Nelson Aldrich, David Rockefeller’s maternal grandfather, will help Schiff, Warburg, Rockefeller and Morgan to set up the criminal Federal Reserve scam. // 3- Mark Twain despised Roosevelt.

After a 10 year run of killing U.S. sailors and Philippine natives, ex-President Roosevelt took to killing elephants, rhinos, leopards and lions as a hobby.

In closing, let us review the adverse consequences and historical mutations which grew out of what one of TR’s backers described as “a splendid little war”:

  • The successful selling of the sinking of The Maine to the gullible public set the original precedent and template for all future false-flags and/or provocations (Lusitania, Pearl Harbor, Tonkin Gulf, USS Liberty, 9-11, the Sandy Hook non-shootings etc)
  • The legal, historic and psychological precedents for America going overseas to fight wars and impose puppet regimes was also established. Without which, US entry in World War I (just 19 years later) would not have been possible.
  • An imperialistic American/NWO naval foothold was established in the Pacific (Philippines, Guam, Hawaii). Without which, the 1905 undermining of Tsarist Russia, the 1930’s U.S. influence over China, and the associated harassment and provocation of Japan (World War II) would not have been possible.
  • Phony “war hero” TR, an unelectable “progressive”, was skyrocketed to the Governorship of New York, then to the Vice Presidency, and finally to the Presidency. Without TR, the establishment of the currency-debasing perpetual debt machine known as ‘The Fed’, and the 1912 election of Woodrow Wilson (yikes!) would not have been possible. (TR ran 3rd Party in 1912 solely for the purpose of splitting the Republican vote and unseating the conservative, William H. Taft.)

Those four monstrous ‘mutations’ alone spawned every other disaster of the past 118 years, making the “pointless” Spanish-American War, in many ways, one of the most important watershed events in American and world history. Indeed, the Spanish-American War was the ‘Typhoid Mary” of the world disasters which followed, and continue to unfold today.

Pearl Harbor and the destructive effects of perpetual war — It all traces back to 1898!