A Closer Look At The Great Reset – A Fake Utopia Sold To Us By Charlatans

As we exit the pandemic, expect to hear much more about The Great Reset and building back better. Far from resulting in a low-carbon dream life, though, it’s a cartoonish fantasy that will hand the global elite even more power.

The Great Reset’ is a term that has been bandied about quite readily by most Western neo-liberal politicians. So often, in fact, and without proper explanation, that it strikes the prudent observer as a kind of paid advertisement.a closer look at the great reset – a fake utopia sold to us by charlatans

But what is it exactly? The term rose to prominence at the 50th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in June 2020. It was initially launched by the Prince of Wales, before being absorbed into the philosophy of the sartorially dystopian sci-fi villain Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the WEF.

The Great Reset refers to a plan to rebuild the world’s infrastructure ‘in a sustainable way’ following the economic ravages of the Covid-19 pandemic and to establish a global treaty to prevent future pandemics, or as it is described more formally, to “build a more robust international health architecture that will protect future generations.” If you ever hear people talking about “building back better,” they are referring to The Great Reset.

Probably the most disturbing part of The Great Reset is how much it strongly resembles business-as-usual, only with EXTRA globalism. Most of the plan’s outlines include a further weakening of national boundaries and individual national autonomy, in favour of a more ‘universal governance.’ As usual, it is the rapidly vanishing Western middle class which must shoulder this burden, as their freedoms are further curtailed to meet the quotas of corporate-media-fuelled activism.

Regardless, many world leaders, no doubt charmed into acquiescence by Schwab’s commandingly sinister Blofeld-esque wardrobe, agreed to the Great Reset, including Boris Johnson, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Mark Rutte, Pedro Sánchez, Erna Solberg and Volodymyr Zelensky. According to John Kerry, Joe Biden’s administration is on board, too.

But the general agreement of the Western leaders is absolutely typical of any agenda which is espoused by NATO, the UN, or the WEF. If an emotionally charged, politically vague and ultimately ineffectual edict or bill is proposed by one of these entities – each resembling a shabby, globe-trotting team of insurance salesmen – our effete politicians line up to show the most fervent compliance.

As a rule, it seems their solutions to specific environmental or scientific problems mysteriously become entwined with LGBTQ+ rights, workplace equity, open borders initiatives and other unrelated social justice causes. It’s as though any goals they have are somehow unilaterally from the same source, or entail the same solution, regardless of causality or consequence. Therefore, a united response to a global pandemic mysteriously also equals trans rights activism.

In their own words“No single government or multilateral agency can address this (pandemic) threat alone. Together, we must be better prepared to predict, prevent, detect, assess and effectively respond to pandemics in a highly co-ordinated fashion.”

There are many other sweeping sentiments expressed by Schwab and his acolytes which can seem either trite or threatening. Consider “the gulf between what markets value and what people value will close” and “we want more attention paid to scientific experts. No one can “self-isolate” from climate change so we all need to “act in advance and in solidarity.” There is much talk of the pursuit of “fairer and equitable outcomes.”

International treaties always tend to be about concentrating power. It’s one of those rules of life, for realists, as there is no escaping power dynamics in human affairs. Real problems don’t often have feel-good solutions. Often, they require ‘solutions that sound mean’, that don’t sound good on a corporate goals bulletin. Initiatives like The Great Reset all entail the gradual loss of the autonomy of individual nations, as their decision-making power is transferred to an international, disembodied rule-maker.

It has been, without a doubt, a globalist fantasy for a long time, but the key question is: do they realise what they are doing or not?

As far as their amazing coordinated pandemic response goes, this appears to be nothing more than forced world-wide vaccinations for EVERYBODY. According to Klaus Schwab himself: “As long as not everybody is vaccinated, nobody will be safe.” To which the attendant neo-liberal world leaders nodded in re-affirming unison, repeating in unison their mantra: “Global public good.”

BREAKING! Klaus Schwab Calls For Global Health Pass Based On Implantable Microchip.

Absolute must-read article on the subject: Very Detailed Explanation Of The Great Reset And The New World Order.

Schwab, despite appearing like an immortal brothel-keeper at Kublai Khan’s Xanadu, is really cut from the same cloth as your typical EU technocrat. His ideas are not creative, they are quite staid and pedestrian, and research of his career shows they have been unchanged since the 1970s. He has consistently been preaching the very same thing, like a broken record.

Schwab believes we can achieve environmental solutions without altering capitalism in the slightest, by creating treaties of “mutual accountability and shared responsibility, transparency and co-operation within the international system.” His idea involves ‘ethical capitalism’ – where the excesses of capitalism will somehow be held at bay by ‘ethical stakeholders,’ to whom the corporations will be held accountable, while (conveniently) the elites and systems already in place will continue as they are. This is the master plan of the World Economic Forum, largely unchanged for 40 years.

The result? A green technocracy, one assumes, with a WEF-mandated ‘ethical stakeholder’ apparatus, a worldwide spiderweb organisation ruling by the threatened fears of pandemic and carbon doom. No section of society would be exempt from edicts of ‘the new treaty.’

The Great Reset website appears to be little more than an advertisement for modern pod-living. It seems to style itself as a low-carbon dream-life (without loss of modern convenience) to effeminate hipsters. One can see slovenly-looking neo-liberal youths, frequent references to LGBTQ+ values, and an overall urgency about carbon footprints.

There is a hint of Adbusters about the website, creator of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Despite the fact that the WEF and Davos and all associated entities are entirely elite institutions, the website styles itself on grassroots urban activism. There is much cringeworthy symbology in its white papers, such as a green and rainbow flag-combination with fey slogans like ‘we salute you, zoom queen!’

Schwab refers to the aim of The Great Reset as “the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” with the first being powered by water and steam, the second introducing mass production, and the third electronic automation. The fourth will blur the lines between “physical, digital and biological spheres.”

In this grab-bag of magical advances, he lists, “fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage and quantum computing.”

This sounds like cartoonish optimism, as many of these technologies are anything but clean and don’t seem to de facto relate to side-stepping out of industrialism or anything else. On top of that, fewer than 9% of companies use the machine learning, robotics, touch screens and other advanced technologies listed as somehow ‘changing everything.’ Stakeholder capitalism, as a concept, does not explain itself as foolproof, and will no doubt be freely interpreted by the likes of Silicon Valley or supply chain conglomerates.

The jewel in the crown of Great Reset optimism has to be the belief that the advent of AI will alter everything positively, again without specifics, to somehow create a low-carbon new world.

It appears at best to be all be smoke and mirrors, a childish corporate fantasy manufactured by isolated bean counters. At worst, it is an intentional power-grab by unaccountable international agencies and hidden oligarchs.

Either way, it is a fake utopia at the price of privacy and autonomy, sold to us by used-car salesmen who think they are princes.

Neom – City of Robots

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“This is the blank page you need to write humanity’s next chapter.” That’s how the promoters of Neom envisage the new $500bn, 26,500sq km megacity in Saudi Arabia which, if all goes according to plan, would be big enough to fit in 37 Singapores.

The name ‘Neom’ unites ‘neo’, the Latin word for new, with ‘m’, representing ‘mostaqbal’, the Arabic word for future.  For crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, the project holds the key to Saudi Arabia’s future in an age when it can no longer rely on oil revenues (which currently account for 92% of its GDP).

Saudi Arabia has built megacities before and they haven’t always gone to plan. Founded 10 years ago, with a projected population of 2m, the port and metropolis of King Abdullah Economic City still houses fewer than 10,000 people. The 73 buildings in the King Abdullah Financial District, just north of the capital Riyadh, have not yet tempted financial institutions to move in. It doesn’t help that, despite the sweeping reforms introduced by Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia remains a difficult country to do business in – it is 94th in the World Bank rankings, just above El Salvador. The kingdom scores even worse when it comes to trading across borders.

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Neom might just succeed though. As Steffen Hertog, associate professor at the London School of Economics, told The Atlantic: “While other cities were held back by unclear jurisdictions and lack of cooperation with relevant authorities, that is unlikely to be an obstacle for Neom.” That backing might also help the city fulfil its founder’s vision as a place that is both more liberal – women will not have to wear the abaya in public, for example – and technologically advanced than other parts of Saudi Arabia.

The project has been endorsed by the IMF, which believes it will stimulate trade. Neom’s location – in the northwest of the kingdom, between the Red Sea and the Hejaz mountains, spilling over into the borders of Jordan and Egypt – is designed to help it become a transnational high-tech economic hub. The Saudi government projects that, by 2030, Neom’s economy will be worth $100bn, a sixth of the country’s GDP and roughly equivalent to the wealth of Las Vegas.

The line about the “next chapter of humanity” sounds grandiose, but plans are afoot for the city to showcase the latest of everything from sea farming, self-driving cars and aircraft, automated public services and virtual currency. Neom will also, the government has pledged, be completely powered by renewable energy.

There will be robots – lots of them, as you might expect from a kingdom that bestowed citizenship rights in a robot, Sophia, last October, the first country in the world to do so. In Neom, robots will probably outnumber residents.

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Bots will certainly, Mohammed Bin Salman’s speeches suggest, play a large part in this new metropolis. When announcing the plan, he declared: “We want the main robot and the first robot in Neom to be Neom, robot number one. Everything will have a link with artificial intelligence, with the internet of things – everything.” As Adam Clarke Estes wrote on Gizomodo: “This is basically the plot of [the Eander Binder story] I Robot, a book which did not turn out well for humans.”

While new technologies always fascinate leaders with futuristic visions, the Saudi government might do well to focus more on people and less on robots. Only 1.2% of the kingdom’s young people can expect to qualify for the equivalent of a master’s degree in their lifetime, according to an OECD study. Half of the population is under 25 – and one in four of that group are unemployed.

Neom will not necessarily resolve that – the crown prince told Bloomberg: “It is not Neom’s duty to create jobs for Saudis. Its duty is to be a world hub for everyone.” It remains to be seen what other action the government might take to alleviate unemployment, especially among the young.

The megacity is being funded, at least in part, by a new Saudi sovereign wealth fund, the Public Investment Fund (PIF). Other sources of finance will be necessary. As Hertog noted: “Because Saudi Arabia is much more financially constrained than it used to be, it may not to be able to make large upfront investments before private money comes.”

The state’s budget deficit is falling but, on the crown prince’s recent visit to the UK, it still stood at $52bn. The sale of 5% of Aramco, the national oil company, was supposed to fill some of that gap but is running behind schedule as officials struggle to meet expectations of a $2trillion valuation.

The good news is that Egypt has backed Neom, agreeing a joint $10bn development plan with Saudi Arabia. “Positive and promising” talks have begun over a similar deal with Jordan. Private investors will probably require more detail before committing to the project.

Building a new city in 13 years is ambitious. Building a new city that will test an array of emerging technologies will be even harder. There is also the disappointing precedent set by Masdar, Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future, a multi-billion dollar metropolis that is home to just 1,300 residents, not the 45,000 it was planned for.

Even if Neom does not become a $100bn urban economy by 2030, that will not necessarily mean it has failed. Mohammed bin Salman may be setting audacious (some might say unrealistic) goals to maintain the momentum of reform. Caution rarely excites, motivates or galvanises – thinking big might achieve the impossible.

Neom could be the crown prince’s equivalent to president John F. Kennedy’s commitment to put an American on the moon by end of the 1960s. As a goal, building a megacity from scratch, on a landscape almost as barren as the moon will certainly, to take a cue from Kennedy’s speech, measure the best of Saudi Arabia’s energies and skills. And if the $500bn gamble succeeds, even partially, it could provide a hopeful model for the future of Saudi Arabia – and the Middle East.

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AI will take over…

brace yourself….

https://www.neom.com/en-us/#what-is-neom

The 1,500-Year-Old Love Story Between a Persian Prince and a Korean Princess that Could Rewrite History

More than a thousand years before the first European explorer reached Korea’s shores, the Persian Empire was writing love stories about Korean princesses.

It’s a little-known story that could change the way we see our history. Recently, historians took a second look an old Persian epic written around 500 AD and realized that, at the center of the tale, was the unusual story of a Persian prince marrying a Korean princess.

It’s an incredible discovery. Up until recently, we weren’t sure that the Persians of that time even knew Korea existed. This new revelation shows Persia didn’t just make contact with Korea – these countries were intimately connected. And it might just call for a total rewrite of history.

The Kushnameh: A 1,500-Year-Old Persian Epic About Korea

The story is called the Kushnameh, and, in itself, it’s hardly a new discovery. It’s one of the most popular stories to come out of the Persian Empire, one that’s been told and retold countless times in the 1,500 years since it was written.

The Kushmaneh is a massive, epic poem about an evil creature with elephant tusks named Kus who terrorizes a Persian family throughout the generations. The whole story spans across hundreds of years and thousands of lines of poetry – but the really interesting part is somewhere around the middle.

There, the author sat down and dedicated an incredible 1,000 lines of poetic verse to describing life in Korea during the Silla dynasty.

King and Queen of Silla. South Korea, Seoul National Folk Museum – Traditional Korean Costumes of Silla Kingdom (57 BC – 935 AD)

A Love Letter to Korea

Korea comes into play when the story starts to focus on a young, noble prince of Persia named Abtin. For his whole life, Abtin has been forced to live in the woods, hiding from the evil Kus the Tusked. He has only one thing to keep him safe: a magic book that tells him his future.

It’s almost like breaking the fourth wall – Abtin has a copy of the book we’re reading, and he’s not above flipping ahead a few pages to see how it all ends.

In fact, that’s just what he does. He reads the next chapter and finds out that he’s supposed to go to the Silla kingdom of Korea, and – after briefly getting confused and going to China – he winds up being welcomed with open arms by the king of Silla.

From here, the story is just page after page of lavish descriptions of how beautiful Korea is. Admittedly, some of it seems a little over-the-top.

It says, for example, that Korea is so overflowing with gold that even the dogs are kept on golden leashes. But on the whole, the description is so accurate that modern historians are sure the author must have visited it himself.

Abtin is mesmerized by the beauty of the country, and, soon after, by the beauty of its princess Frarang. He falls madly in love with Korean princess, begs the king for her hand in marriage, and she soon becomes his wife and the mother of his firstborn son.

Marriage of Abtin and Frarang

The Story of a Korean Hero

It’s unlikely that any of this really happened, of course. For one thing, there’s limited evidence that Persia spent 1,500 years being terrorized by an immortal monster with elephant tusks, and even less that any early Persian princes had magic books that could tell them the future.

But the symbolism of having a Persian prince take refuge in Korea and fall in love with a Korean princess is undeniable. This is hard proof that Persians didn’t just know about Korea 1,500 years ago; they had a deep, profound admiration for their nation.

What happens next, though, is what makes it a really big deal. Frarang’s son isn’t just a minor character. His birth is a turning point in the whole story.

The fully Persian prince spends his whole life in hiding and, when he finally returns to his homeland, ends up getting killed by Kus’s men. But it’s his half-Korean son who turns things around.

Frarang and Abtin’s son ends up raising up an army and leading the revolt against Kus. For centuries, in this story, Persia gets tormented by an evil, tusked monster. It’s only under the command of a half-Korean boy and his mother that Persia finally wins its freedom.

A Secret Hidden in Plain Sight

For 1,500 years, people have been reading this story without any idea what they were looking at. For a long time, we assumed that the story was just about China.

In the story, the Korean Silla kingdom is referred to as “Chin”, a name that could refer to either China or Korea. It’s even a plot point in the story, in fact.

At first, Abtin, like most historians, misreads the “Chin” in his magic future-telling book and thinks he’s supposed to go to China. And, just like modern historians, it takes him years before he realizes that it’s actually talking about China.

Recently, though, historians have taken a look at those descriptions again and realized just how perfectly they really do match up with Korea.

The descriptions in this book don’t sound anything like China, but they’re a perfect, vivid description of 6 th-century Korea – a place where, believe it or not, they really did keep their dogs on leashes of pure gold.

A Total Rewrite of History

This really might completely change the way we see history. For a long time, Korea has seemed an isolated, distant place from the Western world; but this story suggests that the east and west may not have been so disconnected after all.

It took until 1653 before the first European explorer reached Korea. That’s more than 1,100 years after Kushnama was written.

We’ve always known that Persia had some kind of contact with Korea. They were both a part of the Silk Road, and we’ve known for some time that Persian goods somehow ended up in Korea. Generally, though, it was assumed that they were just part of a bigger trade network.

In this story, though, Korea isn’t a trade partner. They’re a trusted ally, and they’re so important to the Persians that they literally can’t overcome evil until they trust the leadership of a half-Korean, half-Persian prince. It’s an incredibly symbolic marriage of cultures.

It puts other relics under a new light, as well. In an ancient tomb in Gyeong-Ju, for example, there is an old monument to a Korean war hero who looks an awful lot more like a Persian soldier than a Korean one.

Now, some people are starting to wonder if this might really be the monument to a forgotten Persian hero who fought for Korea.

There’s no telling how far this could go. It could change everything about how we see the history of these countries. After all, this is far more than a love story between two people. It’s a love story between two nations.