European Nations Adopting National IDs Linked To Digital Wallets

The European Digital Identity system is rapidly being adopted with countries like Estonia and The Netherlands leading the way.

 From Estonia’s long-time running national identity scheme to the Netherlands’s foundational ID, Europe will soon be conducting much of its digital identity authentication and vaccination verification via an EU-wide shared app.

european nations adopting national ids linked to digital wallets

Estonia’s national digital identity system has been established for many years, and now that the European Commission plans to bring in a European Digital Identity in the form of a mobile app, the country is well ahead and planning further.

Under the new framework, proposed in June, national digital identities will be linked with digital wallets for ID authentication and personal attributes; for example, if Facebook wants age verification, the digital wallet should be enough to prove it.

Part of this plan for the European Digital Decade is to reach 100 percent online provision of key public services and 80 percent uptake of digital ID solutions. Each EU country will develop a separate digital wallet app for citizens, according to the Commission.

Estonians have had state-issued digital identities since 2002, and the country launched electronic vaccination passports in April, accelerated by COVID-19. According to Andres Sutt, the Minister of Entrepreneurship and Information Technology, however, Europe is in need of more ambitious digitization projects to meet the expectations of European citizens and the needs of companies.

“An Estonian citizen should have access with their ID card to the same e-services that a Belgian citizen receives today, and vice versa. The eID solutions and services created by the Member States must be available across borders,” Sutt comments.

A mobile application will form the basis of the wallet, says Sten Tikerpe, IT Law & Policy team lead at the Estonian Government CIO Office; “the proposal to update the eIDAS regulation, which regulates e-identification and trust services in the European Union, provides for the creation of so-called ‘identity wallets’ which are intended to be in the form of mobile applications.”

Estonia is currently seeking to tender a contract for a new mobile identification provider to replace the current mobile ID system, which may introduce biometrics to underpin the system’s security.

Though each country will maintain current national ID systems, these systems will form the basis of the European Digital Identity, and Estonia is currently drafting national positions to the proposal published by the Commission, says Tikerpe.

Dutch Government Plans Digital Identity Infrastructure

The Dutch State Secretary for the Interior and Kingdom Relations Raymond Knops says government has a clear task to facilitate a reliable national digital identity infrastructure for the benefit of citizens and businesses, via a letter to parliament on digital identity.

In the future, Dutch citizens will have a unique digital foundational identity (DFI) aiming to speed up innovation and give people sovereignty over personal data as well as providing freedom of choice in terms of digital identity market solutions. The DFI will contain verified identity data that can be used to fuel derived digital identities in the same way physical identity documents (such as a passport and driver’s license) do today.

Such a national identity system would allow users to leverage government-issued and verified attributes, and reduce privacy and security risks. In April Michiel van der Veen of the National Service for Identity Data (RvIG) said that accessibility for everyone would include a non-digital option of the system. The DFI could also boost economic performance by providing a way for people to interact with businesses across the EU under eIDAS regulation, and easing KYC and AML checks.

Though no timeline has been released for the implementation of a DFI, the Dutch government has a clear path forward, according to the digital identity vision document.

How The Internet Of Bodies (IoB) Will Literally Connect You To The Internet

Privacy and security experts have been warning about Internet of Things (IoT) technology for many years and continue to do so (see 1234). Internet of Bodies (IoB) technology falls under the IoT umbrella and it is currently unregulated.

How The Internet Of Bodies (iob) Will Literally Connect You To The Internet

For those who aren’t familiar with what IoT entails, an excellent description has been provided on the Whatis5G.Info website:

The Internet of Things (IoT), as being marketed and sold to the public, is a vision of connecting every “thing” possible to the Internet – all machines, appliances, objects, devices, animalsinsects and even our brains.

In addition, the IoT will include artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality (AR)virtual reality (VR), robotsmicrochipped humans, and augmented humans (humans with some form of technology implanted or integrated into their biology to “enhance” human characteristics or capabilities).

IoT sensors and surveillance cameras will pepper our communities as well. New IoT cyber physical systems will render all objects “smart” – i.e. connected to the Cloud – thus enabling pervasive machine-to-machine (M2M) communications and massive data collection and leaving us open to devastating cyber attacks.

In November, Activist Post reported about a law review article which revealed legal and social issues associated with both IoB and IoT technology.

Additional scary details and pictures were provided in an article published by Truth UnMuted:

The Internet Of Bodies (IoB) And Hacking Your DNA

How Implantable Devices Will Connect Your Body to the Internet

The age of the Internet of Things (IoT), and soon to follow the Internet of Bodies (IoB), is now upon us.

The RAND Corporation, the think tank behind some of the world’s most influential and frightening ideas and technologies, has released a report titled The Internet of Bodies: Opportunities, Risks, and Governance.

You should be wary of any reports issued by the RAND Corporation. Alex Abella, author of Soldiers of Reason: The RAND Corporation and the Rise of American Empire, explains why:

RAND was, and is, the essential establishment organization. Throughout its history, RAND has been at the heart of that interweaving of Pentagon concupiscence and financial rapacity that President Eisenhower aimed to call the military- industrial- legislative complex. RAND has literally reshaped the modern world—and very few know it.

With this understanding, there is much cause for alarm with the issuance of this new report.

What Is The Internet Of Bodies (IoB)?

RAND defines the IoB as “a growing industry of devices that monitor the human body, collect health and other personal information, and transmit that data over the Internet.”

In order to qualify as an IoB device, the technology must:

  • contain software or computing capabilities
  • be able to communicate with an Internet-connected device or network

An IoB device must also satisfy one or both of the following:

  • collect person-generated health or biometric data
  • be able to alter the human body’s function

The technology that Hollywood has presented over the years in dystopian sci-fi fantasies is now a reality.

In the very near future, the technocratic overlords of science, health, finance, and Big Tech desire humanity to go from wearable devices to devices embedded within our bodies.

How IoB Intersects With IoT

IoT devices such as smart meters, smart watches, virtual assistants, and self-driving cars connect directly to the Internet or through a local network.

As IoT devices become more commonplace, experts predict that acceptance of and desire for IoB devices will also increase. The RAND report predicts:

By 2025, there will be more than 41 billion active IoT devices, generating 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily on environment, transportation, geolocation, diet, exercise, biometrics, social interactions, and everyday human lives. This explosion in IoT devices will result in further popularity of IoB devices.

IoB Products In Use Or Being Developed

Figure 1 from the RAND report shows just how invasive and pervasive IoB technology can become. By the time it is fully unleashed, no part of the human body will escape its interference. They even plan to have our toilets connected to the Internet where they will monitor our waste using BioBot technology to determine what we eat, what drugs we may take, and analyze our genetic material!

Here are just a few examples of the technology currently being developed:

  • Augmented reality contact lenses
  • Brain reading and writing devices
  • Body-implanted sensors
  • Clothing with sensors
  • Implantable microchips (RFID and NFC)
  • Mental and emotional sensors
  • Artificial pancreas
  • Bluetooth connected diaper

Not even babies will be able to escape this nightmare where every bodily function is constantly tracked and monitored. The sad part is that many people will welcome these intrusive technologies because they’re convenient and timesaving. However, exchanging bodily sovereignty for convenience is never a fair transaction. It almost always serves to benefit those who desire more control over our lives.

Through adoption of technological advancement, humans are consenting to allow technocrats to dictate every facet of life. Soon doctors will be able to know if you are taking prescribed medication appropriately, and will have tools to report you if you aren’t. Digital pills will be used to record your medical compliance as the RAND report signals – Read full article

As noted in the article, IoB technology requires wireless (WiFi) radiation, 5G and other Electromagnetic Fields (aka “Electrosmog”) in order to perform.  All of these sources are biologically harmful. So there’s that too.

Big Brother And The Rise Of A New (Technological) World Order

Early in the morning of Monday, December 15, 2020, Google suffered a major worldwide outage in which all of its internet-connected services crashed, including Nest, Google Calendar, Gmail, Docs, Hangouts, Maps, Meet and YouTube.

The outage only lasted an hour, but it was a chilling reminder of how reliant the world has become on internet-connected technologies to do everything from unlocking doors and turning up the heat to accessing work files, sending emails and making phone calls.

Big Brother Is Watching You Pyramid All Seeying Eye

With each passing day, people are falling further under the spell of technologically-driven virtual communities, virtual realities and virtual conveniences managed by artificially intelligent machines that are on a fast track to replacing human beings and eventually dominating every aspect of our lives.

Science fiction has become fact.

Yet we are not merely in thrall with technologies that were intended to make our lives easier. We have become enslaved by them.

Look around you. Everywhere you turn, people are so addicted to their internet-connected screen devices — smart phones, tablets, computers, televisions — that they can go for hours at a time submerged in a virtual world where human interaction is filtered through the medium of technology.

So consumed are we with availing ourselves of all the latest technologies that we have spared barely a thought for the ramifications of our heedless, headlong stumble towards a world in which our abject reliance on internet-connected gadgets and gizmos is grooming us for a future in which freedom is an illusion.

Cue the dawning of the Age of the Internet of Things (IoT), in which internet-connected “things” monitor your home, your health and your habits in order to keep your pantry stocked, your utilities regulated and your life under control and relatively worry-free.

The Key Word Here, However, Is Control

In the not-too-distant future, “just about every device you have — and even products like chairs, that you don’t normally expect to see technology in — will be connected and talking to each other.”

This “connected” industry has become the next big societal transformation, right up there with the Industrial Revolution, a watershed moment in technology and culture.

Between driverless cars that completely lacking a steering wheel, accelerator, or brake pedal, and smart pills embedded with computer chips, sensors, cameras and robots, we are poised to outpace the imaginations of science fiction writers such as Philip K. Dick and Isaac Asimov.

These Internet-connected techno gadgets include smart light bulbs that discourage burglars by making your house look occupied, smart thermostats that regulate the temperature of your home based on your activities, and smart doorbells that let you see who is at your front door without leaving the comfort of your couch.

Nest, Google’s suite of smart home products, has been at the forefront of the “connected” industry, with such technologically savvy conveniences as a smart lock that tells your thermostat who is home, what temperatures they like, and when your home is unoccupied; a home phone service system that interacts with your connected devices to “learn when you come and go” and alert you if your kids don’t come home; and a sleep system that will monitor when you fall asleep, when you wake up, and keep the house noises and temperature in a sleep-conducive state.

The aim of these internet-connected devices, as Nest proclaims, is to make “your house a more thoughtful and conscious home.”

For example, your car can signal ahead that you’re on your way home, while Hue lights can flash on and off to get your attention if Nest Protect senses something’s wrong. Your coffeemaker, relying on data from fitness and sleep sensors, will brew a stronger pot of coffee for you if you’ve had a restless night.

Yet given the speed and trajectory at which these technologies are developing, it won’t be long before these devices are operating entirely independent of their human creators, which poses a whole new set of worries.

As technology expert Nicholas Carr notes:

“As soon as you allow robots, or software programs, to act freely in the world, they’re going to run up against ethically fraught situations and face hard choices that can’t be resolved through statistical models. That will be true of self-driving cars, self-flying drones, and battlefield robots, just as it’s already true, on a lesser scale, with automated vacuum cleaners and lawnmowers.”

For instance, just as the robotic vacuum, Roomba, “makes no distinction between a dust bunny and an insect,” weaponized drones — poised to take to the skies en masse this year — will be incapable of distinguishing between a fleeing criminal and someone merely jogging down a street. For that matter, how do you defend yourself against a robotic cop — such as the Atlas android being developed by the Pentagon — that has been programmed to respond to any perceived threat with violence?

Moreover, it’s not just our homes and personal devices that are being reordered and reimagined in this connected age: it’s our workplaces, our health systems, our government, our bodies and our innermost thoughts that are being plugged into a matrix over which we have no real control.

Indeed, it is expected that by 2030, we will all experience The Internet of Senses (IoS), enabled by Artificial Intelligence (AI), Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), 5G, and automation. The Internet of Senses relies on connected technology interacting with our senses of sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch by way of the brain as the user interface. As journalist Susan Fourtane explains:

Many predict that by 2030, the lines between thinking and doing will blur… By 2030, technology is set to respond to our thoughts, and even share them with others…The user needs to only think about the commands, and they will just happen.

In other words, the IoS will rely on technology being able to access and act on your thoughts.

Unfortunately, as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, we have failed to consider what such dependence on technology might mean for our humanity, not to mention our freedoms.

George Orwell understood this:

Orwell’s masterpiece, 1984, portrays a global society of total control in which there is no personal freedom, and advanced technology has become the driving force behind a surveillance-driven society. Snitches and cameras are everywhere. And people are subject to the Thought Police, who deal with anyone guilty of thought crimes. The government, or “Party,” is headed by Big Brother, who appears on posters everywhere with the words: “Big Brother is watching you.”

Make no mistake: the Internet of Things and its twin, the Internet of Senses, is just Big Brother in disguise.

By constitutional attorney John W. Whitehead. He is the founder and president of The Rutherford Institute, and the author of Battlefield America: The War on the American People.