POISONED PRESIDENTS?

Case 1 of 7
William Henry Harrison

Of the eight American presidents who died in office, there are four which we obviously know to have been assassinated by gunfire or post-op doctor “mistakes” — Abe Lincoln (1865), James Garfield (1881), William McKinley (1901)John F Kennedy (1963). Interestingly, each had opposed or crossed the New World Order crime syndicate in one way or another — as had President Andrew Jackson, who, in 1835, survived an attempt on his life when the assailant’s pistols misfired. Two others also survived close-range gunfire attempts — Gerald Ford(1974) and Ronald Reagan(1981).

But what about the four presidents who died in office due to “sudden illness” at relatively young ages? They were William H. Harrison(1841, age 68)Zachary Taylor(1850, age 65)Warren Harding(1923, age 57), and Franklin D. Roosevelt (1945, age 63). Could any or all of them have been poisoned? To that list, we should add James K. Polk, who suddenly became ill and died only three months after leaving office (1849, age 53) — Franklin Pierce, who in 1853, suddenly developed a severe lung illness, at 47, but survived — and James Buchanan, 65, who became extremely ill two months before his inauguration in 1857, and then again on the eve of his inauguration — but also survived.

When you think about it, slipping someone a bit of poison in food or drink has got to be much easier than recruiting (or framing) a “lone nut” gunman and then concocting an elaborate after-the-fact coverup. Of course, without autopsies, all we can do is hypothesize and suspect. But given the fact that powerful networks conveniently stood to benefit from all of these presidential deaths / near deaths, the cases are not only worth considering, but in this writer’s opinion, raise enough doubts to justify exhuming the bodies for forensic analysis.

We will review each case as part of a 7-part series. We begin with William Henry Harrison.

A dangerous job —
 (1-4:) Lincoln (pro-Union, interest free currency, refused to borrow from Rothschild); Garfield (pro-hard money / gold, opposed the big bankers); McKinley (pro-hard money / gold, strict constitutionalist); and JFK (anti-CIA, pro-peace, issued interest-free coins, opposed Israeli nuclear weapons development)
Harrison
Polk,
 Taylor, Pierce (survived), Buchanan (survived), Harding, FDR

William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) of Virginia holds the distinction of having the shortest presidency in American history — just 31 days. To provide some context around the mysterious death of the 9th president, it is important to note that two separate conspiratorial forces were already operating in the United States at that time. They were:

1. The secessionist & expansionist movement of South Carolina’s shady Yale-educated John C. Calhoun and his fellow southern secret society plotters.

2. The relentless drive of Kentucky’s Henry Clay to re-establish a privately owned Central Bank with monopoly over debt-issued currency.

It had only been 6 years before Harrison’s brief presidency that Andrew Jackson — who killed the nation’s Second Central Bank and ended Calhoun’s secession scheme (over the phony pretext of tariffs) by threat of armed force — survived an assassination attempt by a English gunman at a time when he was at war with both Clay and Calhoun. At the end of his presidency, “Andrew the Great,” as quoted by his Vice President and good friend, Martin Van Buren, said:

“I have only two regrets: I didn’t shoot Henry Clay and I didn’t hang John C. Calhoun.”

Harrison earned his fame as a military commander during the war with the American Indians. He was the son of Benjamin Harrison — who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Although he owned some inherited slaves, he was also a pro-Union nationalist — meaning that Calhoun, who coveted the presidency, did not have an ally in the White House. As for Henry Clay — that other arch-villain and presidential rival of Andrew Jackson — he figured that Harrison, a political neophyte who ran as the “Whig Party” candidate, would be beholden to him — Clay being, in essence, the leader of the Whigs. Clay figured wrong.

Clay demanded that Harrison fire everyone in government who’d been appointed by his Democratic predecessors, Andrew Jackson & Martin Van Buren. Harrison would not. The ex-soldier and new president put the mighty Clay in his place and embarrassed him in front of others. Harrison snapped:

“Mr. Clay, you forget that I am president.”

Andrew the Great (Trump’s favorite president) wished that he had killed both Calhoun (the ever-plotting secessionist) and Clay (the tool of the London banking Mafia’s treacherous US agent, Nicholas Biddle).

The dispute between Harrison and Clay escalated when the president named Daniel Webster, Clay’s arch-rival for control of the Whig Party, to the position of Secretary of State. In shortthe same two intriguers, Calhoun & Clay, who would have benefited had the assassination attempt on Andrew Jackson succeeded, also stood to benefit if Harrison were out of the way. Just sayin’.

On, March 26, 1841, Harrison became ill with cold-like symptoms and sent for his doctor. He told the doctor he felt better after having taken medication. The next day, the doctor arrived to find Harrison in bed with a “severe chill.” On, March 28, the president developed severe pain in the side. The doctor then diagnosed him with pneumonia in the right lung. A team of doctors was called the next day. They then drugged Harrison up good and hard with laudanum and opium. 

Mystery surrounded the illness. One Washington newspaper and the Baltimore Sun reported that Harrison’s health was improving. But Harrison’s condition again worsened. He developed severe diarrhea and became delirious, After suffering greatly, he died on April 4, 1841, Palm Sunday,  — just nine days after becoming ill and only 31 days in office. The “official story” sold at the time was that his illness had been caused by the bad weather at his inauguration several weeks earlier. John Tyler, his Vice President, then became president.

* Conspiracy Theory: When President Harrison — who Henry Clay had expected to be a controllable pushover — quickly and forcefully showed that he would not be dictated to by the intriguers of the day, (((they))) poisoned him and “treated” him to death — and then blamed the tragedy on him “not wearing his coat.” Harrison’s successor, John Tyler, conveniently named Calhoun as Secretary of State in 1844, and, with anti-unionist Calhoun directing the effort, annexed  the republic of Texas as a “slave state” (a very controversial move which exacerbated the growing divide) in 1845.

1. Although he was a Whig, the military hero Harrison — like Andrew Jackson — was his own man who quickly made it clear that he was there to serve the people, not the intriguers. // 2. He died an agonizing death, over the course of 9 days.